My Blog
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
February 10, 2019
Category: Recalls

Infant ibuprofen recall expanded

A recall of infant ibuprofen has been expanded to include three more lots that could have high concentrations of the drug.

Tris Pharma Inc. has voluntarily recalled six lots of Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP (NSAID) 50 milligrams per 1.25 milliliters since December 2018.

The medication was sold in 0.5 ounce and 1-ounce bottles to reduce fever and pain under the Equate, CVS Health and Family Wellness brands at Walmart, CVS and Family Dollar stores, respectively. Additional details on lot numbers and expiration dates are available at https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm630112.htm.

No adverse events have been reported to Tris Pharma Inc., but ibuprofen concentrations have been found as high as 10% above the specified limit, according to the company. The higher potency could cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, tinnitus, headache and gastrointestinal bleeding, according to the company. Infants may be more vulnerable to permanent kidney damage.

Customers with questions can contact Tris at 732-940-0358 or micc_tris@vigilarebp.com. Adverse reactions also can be reported to the Food and Drug Administration’s Medwatch Adverse Event Reporting Program at www.fda.gov/medwatch/report.htm.

The Academy recommends that children under 6 months avoid using ibuprofen unless directed by their doctor.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
February 10, 2019
Category: Infectious Disease
Tags: Autism   vaccine   measles   Contagious   Complications  

4 things everyone needs to know about measles

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

We are in the midst of a measles outbreak here in the US, with cases being reported in New York City, New York state, and Washington state. In 2018, preliminary numbers indicate that there were 372 cases of measles — more than triple the 120 cases in all of 2017 — and already 79 cases in the first month of 2019 alone. Here are four things that everyone needs to know about measles.

Measles is highly contagious

This is a point that can’t be stressed enough. A full 90% of unvaccinated people exposed to the virus will catch it. And if you think that just staying away from sick people will do the trick, think again. Not only are people with measles infectious for four days before they break out with the rash, the virus can live in the air for up to two hours after an infectious person coughs or sneezes. Just imagine: if an infectious person sneezes in an elevator, everyone riding that elevator for the next two hours could be exposed.

It’s hard to know that a person has measles when they first get sick

The first symptoms of measles are a high fever, cough, runny nose, and red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis), which could be confused with any number of other viruses, especially during cold and flu season. After two or three days people develop spots in the mouth called Koplik spots, but we don’t always go looking in our family members’ mouths. The characteristic rash develops three to five days after the symptoms begin, as flat red spots that start on the face at the hairline and spread downward all over the body. At that point you might realize that it isn’t a garden-variety virus — and at that point, the person would have been spreading germs for four days.

Measles can be dangerous

Most of the time, as with other childhood viruses, people weather it fine, but there can be complications. Children less than 5 years old and adults older than 20 are at highest risk of complications. Common and milder complications include diarrhea and ear infections (although the ear infections can lead to hearing loss), and one out of four will need to be hospitalized, but there also can be serious complications:

  • Five percent of people with measles get pneumonia. This is the most common cause of death from the illness.
  • One out of 1,000 get encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain, that can lead to seizures, deafness, or even brain damage.
  • One to two out of 1,000 will die.
  • There is another possible complication that can occur seven to 10 years after infection, more commonly when people get the infection as infants. It’s called subacute sclerosing panencephalitis or SSPE. While it is rare (four to 11 out of 100,000 infections), it is fatal.

Vaccination prevents measles

The measles vaccine, usually given as part of the MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) vaccine, can make all the difference. One dose is 93% effective in preventing illness, and two doses gets that number up to 97%. In general the first dose is usually given at 12 to 15 months and the second dose at 4 to 6 years, but it can be given as early as 6 months if there is a risk of exposure (as an extra dose — it doesn’t count as the first of two doses and has to be given after 12 months), and the second dose can be given as soon as 28 days after the first.

The MMR is overall a very safe vaccine. Most side effects are mild, and it does not cause autism. Most children in the US are vaccinated, with 91% of 19-to-35 month-olds having at least one dose and about 94% of those entering kindergarten having two doses. To create “herd immunity” that helps protect those who can’t get the vaccine (such as young infants or those with weak immune systems), you need about 95% vaccination, so the 94% isn’t perfect — and in some states and communities, that number is even lower. Most of the outbreaks we have seen over the years have started in areas where there are high numbers of unvaccinated children.

If you have questions about measles or the measles vaccine, talk to your doctor. The most important thing is that we keep every child, every family, and every community safe.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
February 02, 2019
Category: Healthy Kids
Tags: pregnancy   Free   Webinar   Dental Care   tooth brushing  
 
DON'T MISS THIS FREE HEALTHYCHILDREN.ORG PARENT WEBINAR!
 
 
 
Join us Thursday, February 21, 2018 at 1 pm Central Time!
2PM Eastern Time
 
Good oral health during pregnancy is important for the health of your baby. Women who have cavities when they are pregnant can pass the bacteria that causes them along to their children, and gum disease can lead to premature birth or low birth weight.

Attend this free 45-minute webinar to learn why oral health is important during pregnancy and get tips on how to take care of your own mouth and your little one's once they have arrived. A Q&A session will follow the presentation. 

Not expecting a baby anytime soon? Please help us spread the word by  sharing this important email with friends or family who are pregnantthank you!

 
 
PS: If you are unable to attend the live event, but would still like to be notified when this webinar is archived on HealthyChildren.org, go ahead and register now so we will have your contact information. Thank you! 
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
February 01, 2019
Category: Infectious Disease
Tags: Influenza   Flu   immunizations   Vaccines   flu shot   update   Urgent Care   ER  

 

Note: 2018-19 Flu Season Update
As the flu season continues, please review these reminders and updates below:

  • It is not too late to get a flu shot if you have not received a flu immunization during the current flu season.
  • Receiving a flu vaccine every year offers the best available protection against flu and has been shown to reduce illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths in people of all ages. 
  • If you or someone in your family are diagnosed with a respiratory illness even though you've had a flu shot, flu test confirmed or not, the flu vaccine was effective, especially if they are  seen by a doctor and sent home with minimal treatment.
  • If you or someone in your family have flu-like symptoms that unless instructed by a physician to be given for other medical reasons, you should avoid aspirin and aspirin-containing products (such as Pepto- Bismol, Kaopectate and Alka-Seltzer, for example), which have been associated with rare but severe complications when taken by children and adolescents with flu.
  • If your child needs evaluation at a Children's Healthcare of Atlanta facility when your routine office is closed, it is better to seek care at Children’s urgent care locations as an alternative to the Emergency departments. Families can visit choa.org/locations for more specifics regarding the Urgent Care centers or use the Children’s app on their mobile phones to check wait times at the different locations.
  • Please visit these resources at choa.org/flu to learn more about influenza.

 

Dr. T

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
January 27, 2019
Category: Immunizations
Tags: immunizations   Vaccines   cdc  

CDC Launches New Video Series – “How Vaccines Work” 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases is excited to launch the first video of its newest, animated video series for parents, “How Vaccines Work.”

In these short videos, viewers follow baby Jack and his parents as they get answers to common vaccine-related questions and learn more about the importance of vaccinating on schedule. The first video describes how vaccines fight germs and provide long-lasting protection against 14 serious diseases. Watch “How Vaccines Work: How Do Germs Make Your Baby Sick? here.

CDC will be launching two additional videos in February and March covering topics including: “Vaccines and Your Baby’s Immune System” and “What to Expect When Your Child is Vaccinated.”

Learn more at: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/childhood-vaccines.

 

 




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