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Posts for tag: travel

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
July 01, 2019
Category: Infectious Disease
Tags: immunizations   travel   measles  

CDC Travelers' Health Update

Measles is in many countries and outbreaks of measles are occurring

around the world. People traveling internationally should be fully vaccinated

at least two weeks before traveling. Anyone who is not immune to measles

is at risk of getting infected when they travel. More information.

Which travelers are at risk? You are at risk of measles infection if you travel

internationally and you have not been fully vaccinated against measles or have

not had measles in the past. The best protection against measles is vaccination. 

Measles is extremely contagious. If you are sick, do not travel and avoid contact

with others. Call your doctor and tell them where you traveled. 

What countries are having measles outbreaks? Measles is in many countries

and outbreaks of disease are occurring around the world, including Europe, the

Middle East, Asia, the Pacific, and Africa. Each year, an estimated 10 million

people get measles, and about 110,000 of them die from the disease or complications. 

Currently, many countries are experiencing measles outbreaks; this includes many

popular travel destinations like Israel, Thailand, Vietnam, Japan, Ukraine, England,

Brazil, the Philippines, and more. CDC has issued a Global Travel Notice: Watch

(Level 1) for these outbreaks. Before your next trip, check your destination.

How can I be fully protected before my trip? Make sure you and your family are

fully vaccinated or that you have other evidence of measles immunity. Evidence of

immunity means that you: (1) were born before 1957 or (2) have a lab test showing

that you have had measles in the past, (3) have a lab test showing you were immunized

against measles, or (4) you have written documentation of receiving measles vaccine. 

If you do not have evidence of measles immunity, call your doctor and make an

appointment to get the MMR vaccine. MMR is nearly 100% effective at preventing

measles. If you are unsure if you have had two doses of the vaccine, or do not have

documentation of your prior doses, it is safe to get additional doses. 

Information for you: Check to make sure you are fully vaccinated or otherwise

protected against measles before you travel.
• Infants 6–11 months of age traveling internationally should have one dose of

measles vaccine.

.  Infants vaccinated before 12 months of age should be revaccinated on or after

their first birthday with two doses, separated by at least 28 days.

• Children 12 months of age or older should have two doses, separated by at least

28 days.
• Adolescents and adults who have not had measles or have not been vaccinated

should get two doses, separated by at least 28 days.
• Two doses of MMR vaccine are nearly 100% effective at preventing measles.
• See Vaccine Information Statements (VIS) for more information.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 26, 2019
Category: Infectious Disease
Tags: immunizations   travel   cdc   measles   Travelers  

Most measles cases in the U.S. result from international travel. Make sure you and your loved ones are protected against measles before international travel.

https://www.cdc.gov/measles/plan-for-travel.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fmeasles%2Ftravelers.html

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 18, 2019
Tags: travel   vacation   measles   Traveling  

Measles Cases and Outbreaks

 

Measles outbreaks in the United States are ongoing. For data as of June 13,

visit Measles Cases and Outbreaks.

Most measles cases in the U.S. are related to international travel. Make

sure you and your loved ones are protected before you travel internationally.

Visit Measles: For Travelers.

 

After international travel: Watch for measles

Measles is highly contagious and can spread to others through

coughing and sneezing. Measles is so contagious that if one person has it,

90% of the people close to that person who are not immune will also

become infected. An infected person can spread measles to others 4 days

before the rash even develops.

Watch your health for 3 weeks after you return. Measles symptoms typically

include:

  • high fever (may spike to more than 104° F)
  • cough
  • runny nose (coryza)
  • red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis)
  • rash (3-5 days after symptoms begin)

If you or your child gets sick with a rash and fever, call your doctor. Be sure

to tell your doctor that you traveled abroad, and whether you have received

MMR vaccine.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 08, 2018
Tags: immunizations   Vaccines   newborns   travel   cdc   measles   MMR   Infants   Atlanta   Metro Atlanta  

 

Measles Cases Info from the CDC

From January 1 to April 21, 2018, 63 people from 16 states (Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas) were reported to have measles. No reports, yet, from Georgia.

In 2017, 118 people from 15 states and the District of Columbia were reported to have measles. In 2016, 86 people from 19 states were reported to have measles. In 2015, 188 people from 24 states and the District of Columbia were reported to have measles. In 2014, the United States experienced a record number of measles cases, with 667 cases from 27 states reported to CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD); this is the greatest number of cases since measles elimination was documented in the U.S. in 2000.

  • The majority of people who got measles were unvaccinated.
  • Measles is still common in many parts of the world including some countries in Europe, Asia, the Pacific, and Africa.
  • Travelers with measles continue to bring the disease into the U.S.
  • Measles can spread when it reaches a community in the U.S. where groups of people are unvaccinated.

It is never too late to get a Measles Vaccine if you are unimmunized. If you are planning a trip out of the USA you should definitely look into your Measles Immune status with your doctor or vaccine travel clinic at least a month before you travel. If you have family or friends who have impaired immunity, you should be considerate of them and also confirm that you have Measles immunity. Newborns and young infants can be vulnerable to Measles if it enters our city. There is a small but growing number of persons in Metro Atlanta who are choosing NOT to be immunized, making our area ripe for a Measles outbreak from imported Measles from abroad. We are an international city.

Visit http://www.immunize.org/vis/mmr.pdf to learn more about the Measles vaccine.

Number of measles cases by year since 2010

 

 

Measles cases per year
Year Cases
2010 63
2011 220
2012 55
2013 187
2014 667
2015 188
2016 86
2017 118
2018 63 in 4 months
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
January 29, 2017
Tags: repellents   ticks   travel   vacation   Lyme Disease   DEET  

Ticks Carrying Lyme Disease Confirmed in Eastern National Parks

U.S. National Park Service and CDC advise using insect repellents on clothes and skin by Randy Dotinga Tuesday, January 17, 2017.

(HealthDay News) ‑‑ Planning a hiking trip in an eastern U.S. national park? Better pack tick repellent ‑‑ a new study found these parks are home to ticks that carry Lyme disease. Blacklegged ticks ‑‑ also known as deer ticks ‑‑ carrying Lyme disease were found in nine national parks: Acadia National Park in Maine; Catoctin Mountain Park and Monocacy National Battlefield in Maryland; Fire Island National Seashore in Long Island, N.Y.; Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania; Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C., and Manassas National Battlefield Park, Prince William Forest Park and Shenandoah National Park in Virginia.

This is the first time researchers have confirmed that the ticks are living at the parks, although it's long been suspected that the ticks were there because of human Lyme disease infections. "We know Lyme disease is increasing both in numbers of infections and in geographic range in the United States," said researcher Tammi Johnson in a news National Institutes of Health / U.S. National Library of Medicine release from the Entomological Society of America. Johnson is with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "This is the first large‑scale survey in multiple national parks, and though suspected, it had not been previously confirmed that ticks in many of these parks were infected. It's quite likely that ticks infected with Lyme disease spirochetes are present in other parks in Lyme disease endemic areas, too," she explained.

Lyme disease symptoms include fever, headache and rash. Left untreated, the infection can spread to the heart, joints and nervous system, according to the CDC. Visitors to the parks can reduce their risk of infection by following these guidelines, according to the U.S. National Park Service and the CDC: Use insect repellents that contain 20‑30 percent DEET. Apply them to exposed skin and clothing. You can use permethrin‑containing products on clothing as well. Don't sit or lean on logs when you're out on the trail. Check yourself for ticks ‑‑ and check pets and gear. Remove any ticks you find attached.

Once you leave an area that's home to ticks, shower within two hours. This will help rid your body of ticks. To kill ticks on your clothing, put your clothes in a dryer and heat them on high setting for 10 minutes.

"The results of this study serve as a reminder that while enjoying the parks, visitors can and should take steps to help protect themselves and their loved ones from tick and other bites," Johnson said. The study findings were published in the Journal of Medical Entomology. SOURCE: Entomological Society of America, news release, Jan. 3, 2017