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Posts for tag: pain

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
September 02, 2018
Category: Poison
Tags: Fever   pain   Advil   Pfizer   Errors   Dose   Syringe   cup  

(CNN )If you have children's Advil in your medicine cabinet, check the bottle.

Pfizer, which makes the children's fever reducer and pain reliever, issued a voluntary recall of 4-ounce bottles of the bubble gum-flavored liquid. 
The recall was issued after customer complaints identified that the dosage cup provided is marked in teaspoons while the instructions on the label are given in milliliters (mL).
Consumers should discontinue use of recalled children's Advil.
 
 
Consumers should discontinue use of recalled children's Advil.
"Pfizer concluded that the use of the product with an unmatched dosage cup marked in teaspoons rather than milliliters has a chance of being associated with potential overdose," the company said in its announcement.
Ibuprofen is the active ingredient. Symptoms of an overdose of this medication may include dizziness, drowsiness, vomiting, nausea, headache and blurred vision.
A 2016 study found that 80% of caregivers made an error when dispensing medicine, and the most common mistake was measuring too much of the medicine.
The researchers found that using oral syringes rather than cups reduces those errors.
"When parents used dosing cups, they had four times the odds of making a dosing error, compared to when they used an oral syringe," said Dr. Shonna Yin, an associate professor at NYU Medical School who co-authored that study.
The recall affects one lot, R51129, which was distributed to retailers, wholesalers and distributors across the country between May and June. The expiration date of the recalled medicine is November 2020, and the UPC code is 3-0573-0207-30-0. The NDC code is 0573-0207-30.
Consumers should discontinue use of the medication, Pfizer said, and retailers should not sell it.
Anyone who has experienced a problem from this medication should contact their care provider or report it to the US Food and Drug Administration.

 

Many High School Pitchers Suffer Pain as Pitch Counts Mount

baseball pitcher

MONDAY, June 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The new baseball season could bring pain to lots of America's younger players. By 

New research shows that more than half of all high school pitchers are likely to suffer discomfort in their throwing arm during the season.

"We found that the number of injuries peaked early -- only about four weeks in -- and then slowly declined until the end of the season," said James Onate. He's associate professor of health and rehabilitation sciences at the Jameson Crane Sports Medicine Institute in Columbus, Ohio, part of Ohio State University.

"We see a lot of kids who didn't prepare in the offseason, and when their workload goes through the roof they're not prepared for the demand of throwing," Onate said in a university news release.

For the study, Onate and his colleagues at the university's Wexner Medical Center asked 97 players to submit a weekly questionnaire by text message.

"Most of the pain reported was mild or moderate and players were actually continuing to play through it," Mike McNally, a researcher at Ohio State University's School of Health and Rehabilitation, said in the news release. "Part of the reason we think we're seeing a decline is because players start to get used to playing through the pain as the season goes on. So they likely still have that pain, it just doesn't affect them like it used to."

Onate and McNally are exploring the biomechanics of overuse injuries. They have developed a high-tech pitching mound that measures the amount of force driven by the legs, trunk and arms when throwing. In addition, they have a preseason program that helps pitchers avoid injuries.

"We're starting to pinpoint what's going to be the personalized approach to an individual to be able to throw, and then tweak it from there," Onate said. "The whole goal is to keep the kids safe to be able to do what they want to do."

One idea: extend the high school baseball season so that games aren't played in close succession, the researchers said. That could ease up on repetitive pitches, lowering the injury rate.

"Spreading out games is important in that it allows players to get some recovery time. Rainouts and postponements force kids to go from playing a few games a week to five or six games per week," McNally said. "When that happens, you have a high school kid that's essentially playing a major league schedule, which can accumulate and cause more pain and injuries."

More information

Baseball Strength Training & Injury Prevention Video from the AAP

Little League Elbow

SOURCES: Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, news release, June 1, 2018