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By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
July 07, 2019
Category: Nutrition
Tags: pregnancy   nutrition   FDA   Mercury   Fish   Diet Advice  

FDA Updates Advice on Eating Fish for Pregnant Women, Children

Megan Brooks, July 03, 2019

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has updated advice on fish consumption for women who are pregnant or may become pregnant, breastfeeding mothers, and young children, putting more focus on the health benefits of seafood.  

"Fish and shellfish are an important part of a well-rounded diet. However, we know many parents worry about mercury in fish and even choose to limit or avoid fish because of this concern. In fact, women in the US who are pregnant are consuming far less than the recommended amount of seafood," Susan Mayne, PhD, director of the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, said in a news release.

"Our goal is to make sure Americans are equipped with this knowledge so that they can reap the benefits of eating fish, while choosing types of fish that are safe for them and their families to eat," said Mayne.

Choose Wisely

In January 2017, the FDA and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a reference chart to help consumers more easily understand the types of fish to eat more or less of, based on their mercury levels.

The information in the chart remains the same. However, the revised advice issued July 2 expands information regarding the benefits of fish as part of a healthy diet by promoting the science-based recommendations of the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The advice pertains to people aged 2 and older.

"While it is important to limit mercury in the diets of women who are pregnant or breastfeeding and young children, many types of fish are both nutritious and lower in mercury," the FDA said in the update.   

"The revised advice highlights the many nutritional components in fish, many of which have important roles in growth and development during pregnancy and early childhood. It also highlights the potential health benefits of eating fish as part of a healthy eating pattern, particularly for heart health benefits and lowering the risk of obesity," the FDA said.

Fish provides protein; healthy omega-3 fats; more vitamin B12 and vitamin D than any other type of food; iron, which is important for infants, young children, and women who are pregnant or who could become pregnant; and other minerals such as selenium, zinc, and iodine, the FDA notes.

Last month, the FDA announced it would allow certain "qualified" health claims stating that consuming eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) omega-3 fatty acids in food or dietary supplements may reduce the risk of hypertension and coronary heart disease.

The FDA continues to recommend that adults eat at least 8 ounces of seafood per week based on a 2000 calorie diet.

For an adult, one serving is 4 ounces (about the size and thickness of an adult's palm). Adults should eat two to three servings a week from the "Best Choices" list (or one serving from the "Good Choices" list). For children, one serving is 1 ounce at age 2 and increases with age to 4 ounces by age 11.

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should consume between 8 and 12 ounces of a variety of seafood per week from choices that are lower in mercury.

The 36 types of seafood on the best choices list include salmon, shrimp, pollock, canned light tuna, tilapia, catfish and cod, flounder, haddock, crab, clams, and sole. Nineteen varieties make the good choices list and include bluefish, halibut, mahi mahi, grouper, monkfish, rockfish, snapper, and striped bass (ocean).

The FDA recommends that everyone avoid seven fish that may be high in mercury: king mackerel, marlin, orange roughy, shark, swordfish, tilefish (Gulf of Mexico), and bigeye tuna.

The updated advisory also cautions that some fish caught by family and friends, such as larger carp, catfish, trout, and perch, may contain unknown amounts of mercury or other contaminants. It advises checking local advisories for information on how often it's safe to eat those fish. If there is no advisory, the FDA advises eating only one serving and no other fish that week.

 
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
March 13, 2019
Category: Nutrition
HealthyChildren.org
The only site and newsletter backed by 67,000 AAP pediatricians!
Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult
Focus on National Nutrition Month
March 2019 | Issue No. 183
Beyond Chicken Nuggets: Protein-Rich Alternatives for Picky Eaters
When it comes to getting protein into your child’s diet, you don’t have to get into a power struggle or give in to the daily chicken nugget diet. There are lots of protein-rich alternatives for picky eaters.  
New video: Is your baby hungry or full?

In this new video, you'll learn how to understand, recognize, and respond to your baby's hunger or fullness cues. You can practice responsive feeding when breastfeeding, bottle feeding and when providing solid foods. 

Is Your Baby Hungry or Full? Responsive Feeding Explained
Also In This Issue

How Children Develop Unhealthy Food Preferences

The Benefits & Tricks to Having a Family Dinner

Sports Nutrition for Busy Families and Busy Lifestyles

How Often and How Much Should Your Baby Eat? 

Food and Media: Not a Healthy Mix

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 03, 2018
Category: Nutrition
Tags: nutrition   Healthy Weight   Webinar  

Join HealthyChildren.org and leading childhood obesity expert Dr. Sandra G. Hassink for a free informational webinar
on what you can do as a parent to help your child achieve and maintain a healthy weight. A question and answer session will follow.
 
Registered participants have a chance to win a free copy of Dr. Hassink's new book, Achieving a Healthy Weight for Your Child: An Action Plan for Families, published by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Register Now!

 

Join HealthyChildren.org and leading childhood obesity expert Dr. Sandra G. Hassink for a free informational webinar on what you can do as a parent to help your child achieve and maintain a healthy weight. A question and answer session will follow. Registered participants also have a chance to win a free copy of Dr. Hassink's new book, Achieving a Healthy Weight for Your Child: An Action Plan for Families, published by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
February 04, 2018
Category: Nutrition

From Medical News Today

How you speak to your child may fuel obesity

Published

A recent study provides new insight into how language impacts childhood obesity. The researchers found that the parents of obese children were more likely to use direct statements to prevent them from consuming calorific treats.

Happy family eating
 

A new study investigates language and its role in childhood obesity.

Now that 1 in 3 children in the United States are either overweight or obese, every parent is concerned about their child's eating habits. Understanding how and why some children become obese is urgent.

The way that parents behave and interact while feeding their children is known to be important, but the story is complex. Restricting food can actually, paradoxically, increase how much a child eats overall.

Researchers recently set out to investigate a part of this conundrum: the role of language. They wanted to understand how the way in which we speak to our children about what they should or should not eat impacts dietary choices.

Language and obesity

It's a given that the way in which a parent speaks to their child has an impact on their behavior. And, according to the latest research — which is now published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior — this also applies to eating habits.

Lead researcher Dr. Megan Pesch, who is a developmental and behavioral pediatrician, believes that the current study is the first to examine "the impact of parental direct imperatives in restricting a child's intake of unhealthy food."

Currently, there is little advice available on how to speak with children about their dietary choices. As Dr. Pesch explains, "So many of the guidelines are focused on what not to do. There's a lot of emphasis on what parents shouldn't be doing and what doesn't work."


The caregiver-child pairs were alone in a room and were presented with different foods, including chocolate cupcakes.In the study, Dr. Pesch and team — from the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital in Ann Arbor — videotaped 237 mothers (or primary caregivers) and their children, who were aged 4–8. The caregivers were all from low-income homes, a demographic known to be particularly at risk of childhood obesity.

Dispelling parenting myths

There is a stigma attached to the parents of obese children. Often, people assume that they simply allow their child to eat whatever they want, whenever they want. This study demonstrated that the reverse was true. As Dr. Pesch explains, "They were attentive and actively trying to get their children to eat less junk food."

However, the scientists noted a subtly different linguistic approach. According to their findings, the caregivers of obese children were 90 percent more likely to use direct language, such as "Only eat one" or "You're eating both of those? No! Don't! Oh my gosh."

The mothers of children at a healthy weight, however, were more likely to use indirect phrases, such as "That's too much. You haven't had dinner."

This is the reverse of what might be expected; a more direct, firm message is thought to be most effective when talking to a child regarding discipline, or sleep, for instance.

"Indirect or subtle statements don't seem to work as well in general parenting. Direct messages are usually easier for kids to interpret and understand where the limits are. But there's more sensitivity around how to talk to children about eating and weight."

Dr. Megan Pesch

The authors note a number of limitations to the study. For instance, the caregivers knew that they were being filmed as part of an experiment, which could have altered their behavior.

Also, only individuals from lower socioeconomic backgrounds were involved, and the new findings may not apply to other demographics.

As this is the first study of its kind, there will need to be much more work before firm conclusions can be drawn. Only then can solid advice be given to parents. Dr. Pesch and her team plan to continue this line of investigation.

"We hope," she says, "to find better answers to the ultimate question of what parents should do to help set their child up for healthy eating long-term."

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
January 16, 2018
Category: Nutrition
Tags: nutrition   cooking   Meals   Meal Planning   Magazines   ChopChop  

Resolve To Cook More In 2018

 

Even though it’s winter, ChopChop is putting the finishing touches on their spring issue. And they still have a few ChopChop aprons left! Order a one-year subscription to this wonderful magazine and get a ChopChop apron, all for just $35. The gift set makes a great birthday or anytime gift for anyone who loves to cook--and anyone who wants to learn how. Order now. 

Hungry for more? Follow them between issues for behind the scenes photos, recipes, events, and more on Facebook,TwitterPinterest, and Instagram.

This is a great family magazine that promotes families cooking together nutritious meals in their homes.

Dr. T