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Posts for tag: measles

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
August 26, 2019
Category: Infectious Disease
Tags: immunizations   travel   measles   Europe  

April 2019

CDC Announces 71 More Measles Cases.

The AP (4/22) reports that there were 71 more measles cases in the US last week, and 68 of them were in New York, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There have now been 626 total cases so far this year, and the article points out that there were 667 cases in all of 2014 and 963 in 1994.

        The Wall Street Journal (4/22, Subscription Publication) reports that health officials expect this year’s total to surpass that of 2014, which would make 2019 the worst year since 2000 when the disease stopped continuous circulation and was declared eliminated. The article notes that the largest outbreak so far this year has been centered in New York City’s ultra-Orthodox Jewish community and that New York City has ordered people living in certain neighborhoods to be vaccinated or pay a $1,000 fine.

        ABC News (4/22) reports on its website that 194 of this year’s cases have been in New York’s Rockland County and according to local health officials, 80.8% of those infected in the county never received an MMR vaccine.

        Reuters (4/22) reports that last week, Iowa and Tennessee reported their first cases of measles this year.

        USA Today (4/22) reports that Peter Marks, director of the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, said in a statement that the reemergence of measles “deeply concerns us.” Marks added, “We cannot state strongly enough: The overwhelming scientific evidence shows that vaccines are among the most effective and safest interventions to both prevent individual illness and protect public health. Vaccinating against measles, mumps and rubella not only protects us and our children, it protects people who can’t be vaccinated, including children with compromised immune systems due to illness and its treatment, such as cancer.”

        NBC News (4/22) reports on its website that Dr. Steven J. Goldstein, a pediatrician in Brooklyn and president of the New York Chapter 2 of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said the measles outbreak is straining families and their physicians, “When there is a child in your practice with measles or it turns out the child has measles later, you have to close the office and investigate; you have to contact everybody who was in the practice at or around the time of exposure. Everyone needs to be notified about that possible exposure.”

 

Measles outbreaks in the United States are ongoing. For data as of August 15, visit Measles Cases and Outbreaks.


Most measles cases in the U.S. are related to international travel. Make sure you and your loved ones are protected before you travel internationally.

Visit Measles: For Travelers.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
July 01, 2019
Category: Infectious Disease
Tags: immunizations   travel   measles  

CDC Travelers' Health Update

Measles is in many countries and outbreaks of measles are occurring

around the world. People traveling internationally should be fully vaccinated

at least two weeks before traveling. Anyone who is not immune to measles

is at risk of getting infected when they travel. More information.

Which travelers are at risk? You are at risk of measles infection if you travel

internationally and you have not been fully vaccinated against measles or have

not had measles in the past. The best protection against measles is vaccination. 

Measles is extremely contagious. If you are sick, do not travel and avoid contact

with others. Call your doctor and tell them where you traveled. 

What countries are having measles outbreaks? Measles is in many countries

and outbreaks of disease are occurring around the world, including Europe, the

Middle East, Asia, the Pacific, and Africa. Each year, an estimated 10 million

people get measles, and about 110,000 of them die from the disease or complications. 

Currently, many countries are experiencing measles outbreaks; this includes many

popular travel destinations like Israel, Thailand, Vietnam, Japan, Ukraine, England,

Brazil, the Philippines, and more. CDC has issued a Global Travel Notice: Watch

(Level 1) for these outbreaks. Before your next trip, check your destination.

How can I be fully protected before my trip? Make sure you and your family are

fully vaccinated or that you have other evidence of measles immunity. Evidence of

immunity means that you: (1) were born before 1957 or (2) have a lab test showing

that you have had measles in the past, (3) have a lab test showing you were immunized

against measles, or (4) you have written documentation of receiving measles vaccine. 

If you do not have evidence of measles immunity, call your doctor and make an

appointment to get the MMR vaccine. MMR is nearly 100% effective at preventing

measles. If you are unsure if you have had two doses of the vaccine, or do not have

documentation of your prior doses, it is safe to get additional doses. 

Information for you: Check to make sure you are fully vaccinated or otherwise

protected against measles before you travel.
• Infants 6–11 months of age traveling internationally should have one dose of

measles vaccine.

.  Infants vaccinated before 12 months of age should be revaccinated on or after

their first birthday with two doses, separated by at least 28 days.

• Children 12 months of age or older should have two doses, separated by at least

28 days.
• Adolescents and adults who have not had measles or have not been vaccinated

should get two doses, separated by at least 28 days.
• Two doses of MMR vaccine are nearly 100% effective at preventing measles.
• See Vaccine Information Statements (VIS) for more information.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 26, 2019
Category: Infectious Disease
Tags: immunizations   travel   cdc   measles   Travelers  

Most measles cases in the U.S. result from international travel. Make sure you and your loved ones are protected against measles before international travel.

https://www.cdc.gov/measles/plan-for-travel.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fmeasles%2Ftravelers.html

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 18, 2019
Tags: travel   vacation   measles   Traveling  

Measles Cases and Outbreaks

 

Measles outbreaks in the United States are ongoing. For data as of June 13,

visit Measles Cases and Outbreaks.

Most measles cases in the U.S. are related to international travel. Make

sure you and your loved ones are protected before you travel internationally.

Visit Measles: For Travelers.

 

After international travel: Watch for measles

Measles is highly contagious and can spread to others through

coughing and sneezing. Measles is so contagious that if one person has it,

90% of the people close to that person who are not immune will also

become infected. An infected person can spread measles to others 4 days

before the rash even develops.

Watch your health for 3 weeks after you return. Measles symptoms typically

include:

  • high fever (may spike to more than 104° F)
  • cough
  • runny nose (coryza)
  • red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis)
  • rash (3-5 days after symptoms begin)

If you or your child gets sick with a rash and fever, call your doctor. Be sure

to tell your doctor that you traveled abroad, and whether you have received

MMR vaccine.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 26, 2019
Category: Infectious Disease
Tags: immunizations   measles   update   2019   Vaccinations   Public Health  

Measles – 2019 Outbreaks

 

Total Number Of Measles Cases In US Climbs To 25-Year High Of 971, CDC Reports

The Washington Post (5/30) reports there have been 971 cases of measles in the US so far this year, “the greatest number since 1994, when 963 cases were reported for the entire year,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The agency announced the new total on Thursday, rather than waiting for Monday when it typically updates the count, “because it had reached this new milestone.”

       

The New York Times (5/30) reports CDC Director Robert Redfield said, “Measles is preventable and the way to end this outbreak is to ensure that all children and adults who can get vaccinated, do get vaccinated.” Redfield added, “Again, I want to reassure parents that vaccines are safe, they do not cause autism. The greater danger is the disease that vaccination prevents.” The Times adds that the “measles was eliminated as an endemic disease in the United States in 2000,” but if the current outbreak continues then the US could lose that status, “meaning the disease would be considered endemic in the country for the first time in a generation.”

 

Updated 5/22/2019 

Pediatricians are monitoring multiple outbreaks of measles across several U.S. states.

Situation

  • Current outbreak locations:
  • Number of infections: 880 cases in 24 states (from 1/1/19 through 5/17/19)
  • Pediatric population affected: All pediatric populations at risk. Patients 19 years or younger have accounted for 77% of the cases so far; 48% have been younger than 5 years old.
  • The main outbreaks have been associated with travelers who brought measles back from Israel, Ukraine, and the Philippines.
  • Cases have been reported in Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Tennessee, and Washington.

Background

  • Infants and children aged less than 5 years, adults aged more than 20 years, pregnant women, and people with compromised immune systems, such as from cancer, chemotherapy, or HIV infection, are at high risk for severe illness and complications from measles.
  • Measles can cause serious illness requiring hospitalization, even in previously healthy children.
  • Consider measles in patients with fever and rash and ask about recent international travel, exposure to international travelers, or exposure to people with measles
  • During an outbreak, MMR vaccine should be offered to all people exposed or in the outbreak setting who lack evidence of measles immunity. During a community-wide outbreak that affects infants, MMR vaccine has been shown to be effective in preventing symptoms after exposure and may be recommended for infants 6 through 11 months of age.
  • Involvement of state and local health departments is often advisable for any diagnosis of measles, as there may be specific ways these departments wish to receive specimens and manage patients.

Actions as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the U.S. Public Health Service

Resources

10 Things You Should Know about Measles: