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Posts for tag: injury

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 10, 2018
Category: Safety
Tags: safety   Fireworks   injury   July 4th   July Fourth  

 

Do Not Let Children Play With Fireworks

We urge you to celebrate the holidays safely! Fireworks are involved in thousands of injuries treated in US hospital emergency room visits each year. The best defense against children suffering severe eye injuries and burns is to not let children play with any fireworks. You can further protect yourself and your family by attending only authorized public fireworks displays conducted by licensed operators (but be aware that even professional displays can be dangerous).

If an accident does occur, these six steps can help save your child’s sight:

  • Do not let your child rub the eye. Rubbing the eye may increase bleeding or make the injury worse.
  • Do not attempt to rinse out the eye. This can be even more damaging than rubbing.
  • Do not apply pressure to the eye itself. Hold or tape a foam cup or the bottom of a juice carton over the eye. Protect the eye from further contact with any item, including the child’s hand.
  • Do not stop for medicine! Over-the-counter pain relievers will not do much to relieve pain. Aspirin (should never be given to children) and ibuprofen can thin the blood, increasing bleeding. Take the child to the emergency room at once – this is more important than stopping for a pain reliever.
  • Do not apply ointment. Ointment, which may not be sterile, makes the area around the eye slippery and harder for the doctor to examine.
  • Do not let your child play with fireworks, even if his/her friends are setting them off. Sparklers burn at 1800 degrees Fahrenheit and bottle rockets can stray off course or throw shrapnel when they explode.

Click Here to reach the fireworks information center.

Stay Safe this 4th of July

There is No Safe Way to Use Backyard Fireworks

Fireworks Safety and Tip Sheets

 

Many High School Pitchers Suffer Pain as Pitch Counts Mount

baseball pitcher

MONDAY, June 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The new baseball season could bring pain to lots of America's younger players. By 

New research shows that more than half of all high school pitchers are likely to suffer discomfort in their throwing arm during the season.

"We found that the number of injuries peaked early -- only about four weeks in -- and then slowly declined until the end of the season," said James Onate. He's associate professor of health and rehabilitation sciences at the Jameson Crane Sports Medicine Institute in Columbus, Ohio, part of Ohio State University.

"We see a lot of kids who didn't prepare in the offseason, and when their workload goes through the roof they're not prepared for the demand of throwing," Onate said in a university news release.

For the study, Onate and his colleagues at the university's Wexner Medical Center asked 97 players to submit a weekly questionnaire by text message.

"Most of the pain reported was mild or moderate and players were actually continuing to play through it," Mike McNally, a researcher at Ohio State University's School of Health and Rehabilitation, said in the news release. "Part of the reason we think we're seeing a decline is because players start to get used to playing through the pain as the season goes on. So they likely still have that pain, it just doesn't affect them like it used to."

Onate and McNally are exploring the biomechanics of overuse injuries. They have developed a high-tech pitching mound that measures the amount of force driven by the legs, trunk and arms when throwing. In addition, they have a preseason program that helps pitchers avoid injuries.

"We're starting to pinpoint what's going to be the personalized approach to an individual to be able to throw, and then tweak it from there," Onate said. "The whole goal is to keep the kids safe to be able to do what they want to do."

One idea: extend the high school baseball season so that games aren't played in close succession, the researchers said. That could ease up on repetitive pitches, lowering the injury rate.

"Spreading out games is important in that it allows players to get some recovery time. Rainouts and postponements force kids to go from playing a few games a week to five or six games per week," McNally said. "When that happens, you have a high school kid that's essentially playing a major league schedule, which can accumulate and cause more pain and injuries."

More information

Baseball Strength Training & Injury Prevention Video from the AAP

Little League Elbow

SOURCES: Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, news release, June 1, 2018

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 26, 2018
Category: Safety
Tags: safety   Zip lines   injury   backyard  
 
From the Academy of Pediatrics

Look before you leap: Follow these zip line safety tips

Trisha KoriothStaff Writer
 
  • Parent Plus
 

Before you harness your child into a zip line at camp or during a family vacation, you might want to ask the operator a few questions about the ride’s safety.

A common attraction at camps, amusement parks and in backyards, zip lines are popular across the U.S. But not every company follows the same safety rules.

Nearly 17,000 zip line injuries were treated in emergency rooms from 1997-2012, and most of those injuries were in the last four years, according to a 2015 study by Gary A. Smith, M.D., Dr.P.H., FAAP, and colleagues at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. About half the injuries involved children under 10 years old. Another 33% involved children ages 10-19 years. The study noted that many zip lines are not regulated, and there are no uniform safety standards.

The increase in the number of zip line injuries in children is “an epidemic by any definition,” according to Dr. Smith, past chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Council on Injury, Violence and Poison Prevention.

“If kids are using them, you really need to make sure they’re using them in places where people are trained, they know what they’re doing and the zip lines have been constructed in a way that they’re not going to fail,” said Dr. Smith.

Backyard zip line kits sold online and in stores also have been linked to injuries. Earlier this year, the Consumer Product Safety Commission recalled a backyard zip line kit (http://1.usa.gov/1XoHrFs) because of a design flaw that made it easy for the cable to separate from the line, causing riders to fall. Riders suffered head injuries and bruises. Another recall was issued in 2014 for backyard zip line trolleys (http://1.usa.gov/1RT6uaY) that released unexpectedly. No injuries were reported. Authors of the 2015 study warned against buying and installing backyard zip lines.

The AAP does not have a policy on zip lines and children. However, Dr. Smith suggested the following safety precautions:

  • requiring riders to wear a helmet, harness and gloves;
  • training operators;
  • inspecting and maintaining equipment regularly; and
  • posting rules and requiring participants to follow them.

“If done correctly, these and other types of outdoor amusements that are there for the thrill … can be done in a safe enough way that it’s reasonable for children to use them,” Dr. Smith said.