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By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
July 31, 2018
Category: Books
Tags: Books   high school   college   ADD   ADHD  

ADD and the College Student: A Guide for High School and College Students with Attention Deficit Disorder Revised Edition, Kindle Edition

 
ISBN-13: 978-1557986634
ISBN-10: 1557986630


 

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Useful for addressing the existence of attention deficit disorder beyond the hyperactivity of childhood, this reassuring book frankly covers the realities and logistics of having ADD. It serves as a helpful guide to selecting and entering college and to succeeding there. Various professionals (physicians, psychologists, educators, and lawyers) and "real life" experts (college students and parents) describe the challenge of ADD and its impact on the college experience in short, lucid chapters. Throughout, the underlying message is that students should recognize the limitations that ADD presents and seek help in finding remedies for their particular problems. Individual sections address the manifestations of ADD, cover various treatments, outline college programs, consider learning accommodations that students might utilize, and review ADD students' legal rights. Good for students (still in high school or new to college), for parents (who are coping with the angst of an adolescent as well as an ADD student), and for high-school and college faculty and administrators in need of some straight talk about ADD. This guidebook is practical, realistic, optimistic, and reassuring for both teens and adults. Irene Wood

 

Review

Praise for the first edition: "…serves as a helpful guide to selecting and entering college and succeeding there…This guidebook is practical, realistic, optimistic, and reassuring for both teens and adults." —Booklist "…A resource to empower young people on their way to achieving their potentials and making it to adulthood." —Mary McDonald Richard Student Disability Services, University Of Iowa

 

About the Author

Dr. Quinn is a developmental pediatrician in the Washington, DC, area. A graduate of Georgetown University Medical School, she specializes in child development and psychopharmacology.

Dr. Quinn has worked for over 28 years in the areas of ADD and learning disabilities. She gives workshops nationwide and has appeared on Lifetime TV’s NEW ATTITUDES and the PBS show TO THE CONTRARY to discuss the issue of girls and women with ADD. Dr. Quinn has also appeared on the PBS program OUTSIDE IN: A Look at Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder.

Dr. Quinn is the author of Adolescents and ADD: Gaining the Advantage, and is also coauthor or coeditor of several other books on ADD. These include the bestselling Putting on the Brakes: A Young People’s Guide to Understanding Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (for 8 to 12 year old children), its companion workbook, The "Putting on the Brakes" Activity Book for Young People with ADHD, and The Best of "Brakes": An Activity Book for Kids with ADD, all coauthored or coedited with Judith M. Stern, M.A.

Dr. Quinn lives in Washington, DC, with her husband and four children, two of whom have ADD

 

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By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 27, 2018
Category: Healthy Kids

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems

 

From the Academy of Pediatrics:

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS), also called e-cigarettes, personal vaporizers, vape pens, e-cigars, e-hookah, or vaping devices, are products that produce an aerosolized mixture containing flavored liquids and nicotine that is inhaled by the user. ENDS can resemble traditional tobacco products like cigarettes, cigars, pipes, or common gadgets like flashlights, flash drives, or pens.

These products have grown rapidly, particularly among youth and young adults. Youth use of ENDS products​​​ is a significant public health concern.

 

Quick Facts about ENDS

  • ENDS are the most commonly-used tobacco products among youth. In 2016, 11% of high schoolers and 4% of middle schoolers reported using e-cigarettes in the last 30 days.1
     
  • Youth who use ENDS products are more likely to use cigarettes or other tobacco products.​2,6
     
  • ENDS contain a liquid solution that is usually flavored. Flavors, which are appealing to children, can include fruit flavors, candy, coffee, piña colada, peppermint, bubble gum, or chocolate. You can read more about the ways the Tobacco Industry uses flavors to lure kids into using tobacco products in “The Flavor Trap​,” a report issued by AAP and four partner organizations.

  • ENDS solution has chemicals (ie, anti-freeze, diethylene glycol, and carcinogens like nitrosamines).3​​

  • ENDS devices mimic conventional cigarette use and help re-normalize smoking behaviors.

  • ENDS are not approved for smoking cessation, and the long-term health effects to users and bystanders are st​ill unknown. The chemical compounds in an ENDS device can vary between brands.3

  • E-liquid from ENDS devices and refill packs can contaminate skin, leading to nicotine poisoning. Symptoms of nicotine poisoning include vomiting, sweating, dizziness, increased heart rate, lethargy, seizures, and difficulty breathing.3

  • In 2014, poison centers in the US reported 3,783 exposures to e-cigarette devices and nicotine liquid, compared to only 1,543 exposures in 2013. In 2015, 3,073 exposures were reported.4

  • Some states have enacted legislation to require child-resistant packaging for ENDS devices and liquids, and a bill to do this at the national level was signed into law by President Obama in early 2016.

  • ENDS users should always keep e-cigarettes and liquid nicotine locked up and out of the reach of children and follow the specific disposal instructions on the label.5

  • In 2016, US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, MD MBA released a report, "E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General." The report concluded that youth should not use e-cigarettes due to the health effects on users and on others exposed to secondhand e-cigarette aerosol.6​

AAP Resources about ENDS

Sources

1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tobacco Use Among Middle and High School Students—United States, 2011–2016. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2017;66(23):597-603. Accessed July 28, 2017

2) Dutra LM, Glantz SA. Electronic cigarettes and conventional cigarette use among U.S. adolescents: a cross-sectional study. JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(7):610–617pmid:24604023​

3) American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Tobacco Control. Policy statement: Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems. Pediatrics. 2015; 136(5):1018—1026.

4) American Association of Poison Control Centers. January 31, 2016. Electronic Cigarettes and Liquid Nicotine Data. Accessed February 10, 2016.

5) American Association of Poison Control Centers. E-Cigarette Devices and Liquid Nicotine. Accessed October 16, 2015.

6) US Department of Health and Human Services (2016). E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
March 01, 2018
Category: Books

Bestselling 5 Star Graduation Gift for both College and High School grads!

Recommended by eBay, Forbes, Lifehack, Elite Daily, Real Simple and Bustle.

Why do high schools and colleges require students to take courses in English, math and science, yet have absolutely no requirements for students to learn about personal money management? Why Didn't They Teach Me This in School? 99 Personal Money Management Lessons to Live By was initially developed by the author to pass on to his five children as they entered adulthood. As it developed, the author realized that personal money management skills were rarely taught in high schools, colleges and even in MBA programs. Unfortunately, books on the subject tend to be complicated, lengthy reads. The book includes eight important lessons focusing on 99 principles that will quickly and memorably enhance any individual's money management acumen. Unlike many of the personal money management books out there, this book is a quick, easily digested read that focuses more on the qualitative side than the quantitative side of personal money management. The principles are not from a text book. Rather, they are practical principles learned by the author as he navigated through his financial life. Many are unorthodox in order to be memorable and provoke deeper thought by the reader. Not only an excellent graduation gift for high school and college students but also a great read for any adult!