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Posts for tag: death

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
November 06, 2018
Tags: Influenza   Flu   immunizations   Vaccines   death   Myths  

 

A child in Florida has become the first person to die of the flu this season, according to state health officials. State epidemiologists say the child had not been vaccinated and was otherwise healthy before getting sick with the flu.

The child, who tested positive for influenza B, died sometime during the week of Sept. 30, although privacy concerns prevent officials from saying exactly where, CBS affiliate WTSP reports.

Last flu season, 183 children in the U.S. died from flu or flu-related causes. That's the most since the CDC began keeping these records in 2004. Overall, an estimated 80,000 Americans died from flu last season.

CBS News medical contributor Dr. Tara Narula says this latest news should be a wake-up call to parents to get their children vaccinated. 

"What this is a strong clear message to parents about the importance of vaccination," she told "CBS This Morning." "This vaccine is safe. It is the most effective tool we have. And we know of the pediatric deaths last year, 80 percent were in kids who were unvaccinated."

8 common myths about cold and flu debunked

A new survey suggests that many children may not be getting the potentially life-saving flu shot because of their parents' misconceptions about the safety and importance of vaccines.

The survey by Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital found:

More than half of parents think that their child can get the flu from the flu shot.30 percentof parents feel flu vaccines are a conspiracy.28 percentof parents believe flu vaccines can cause autism.

"None of these things are true. It's important that we deal with the science and the facts," Narula said.

The CDC recommends everyone age 6 months and older get vaccinated against the fluevery year.

"Officials have said it's like wearing a seat belt," Narula said. "This is really a no-brainer for parents."

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 11, 2018
Category: Infectious Disease
Tags: Influenza   Flu   flu shot   vaccine   immunization   death   epidemic  

 

This Year’s Flu Season Killed Record Number Of Children.

The Washington Post (6/8) said a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report indicates that the flu “killed 172 children between October and May, making this season one of the deadliest since federal health authorities began tracking pediatric deaths 14 years ago.” The new figure “exceeds the 171 child deaths reported for 2012-2013, the previous record for a regular season,” according to the Post, which added, “Only the 2009 swine flu pandemic, which killed 358 children, was worse.” Daniel Jernigan, head of the CDC’s influenza division, explained that the number of deaths “is a record number since we’ve been keeping track, outside of the pandemic” and is considered to be an undercount because it only includes cases confirmed by laboratories listed on death certificates and reported to the CDC.

        The AP (6/8) reported, “The past flu season wasn’t a pandemic, but it was long – 19 weeks” – and “also was unusually intense, with high levels of illness reported in nearly every state for weeks on end.

        Newsweek (6/8) reported that according to the CDC, “About 80 percent of the fatalities were among children who hadn’t been vaccinated.”

 

Let's all hope the flu vaccine picked for next epidemic season will be right on and effective.

Dr.  T

 

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 26, 2018
Category: Uncategorized

 

Researchers Quantify How Long It Takes For Cars To Reach Killer Temperatures.

 

TODAY (5/24) reports that researchers have quantified “how long it takes for cars to reach killer temperatures in either the sun or the shade.” Testing six cars of various sizes and makes, researchers found that “left in the sun on a 100-degree day in Arizona, it took just an hour for the interior temperature to hit 116 degrees.” In the shade, “interior temperatures reached 100 degrees after one hour and seats were 105 degrees.” The article points out that heatstroke becomes damaging “when a child’s body temperature rises above 104 degrees.”

 

        HealthDay (5/24) reports that researchers next “modeled how a two-year-old child might fare in such conditions.” The investigators found that just “one hour in a sunny spot or two hours in a shaded vehicle could cause heat injury or even death.” The findings were published online in the journal Temperature.

 

        The Tennessean (5/24) reports that the American Academy of Pediatrics has some recommendations “to minimize child deaths in hot cars,” including never leaving a “small child alone in a car under any circumstances,” not even for a moment, and not even when the car’s air conditioning is running.

 

        FURTHER READING

        Prevent Child Deaths in Hot Cars

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 26, 2018
Category: Safety
Tags: safety   Poisoning   button battery   ingestion   death  

From the Academy of Pediatrics

Button batteries can cause injuries, death if swallowed

Trisha KoriothStaff Writer
 
  • Parent Plus
 

When you need to change a button battery, hunting down a screwdriver to open the tiny lid that covers the battery may seem like a nuisance. But the American Academy of Pediatrics urges parents to make sure the lid is closed tightly to keep the batteries out of children’s reach.

Children can suffer serious injuries or die if they swallow button batteries. Injuries are most common in children under 5 years old.

Children can suffer serious injuries or die if they swallow button batteries. Photo courtesy of Robert E. Kramer, M.D.
Children can suffer serious injuries or die if they swallow button batteries. Photo courtesy of Robert E. Kramer, M.D.

The batteries are used in toys, remote controls, thermometers, hearing aids, calculators, bathroom scales, key fobs, cameras and holiday ornaments.

Lithium batteries the size of a penny or larger are the most dangerous, and even dead batteries are harmful when swallowed. Smaller batteries also can get caught in the esophagus, or children can put them in their ears or nose.

If you think your child may have swallowed a button battery, go to the emergency room right away. Batteries can cause serious burns within two hours of being swallowed, so they need to be removed as soon as possible. Children also have died after batteries were removed because of tissue damage that caused massive internal bleeding.

A child who swallows a button battery may have the following symptoms: blocked airway, wheezing, drooling, vomiting, chest pain, trouble swallowing, no appetite or coughing and gagging when eating.

Children who put batteries in their ear may have drainage from the ear, pain, hearing loss or facial paralysis. If a battery is put into a nostril, it can cause nasal tissue injury, infection and damage or holes in the cartilage that separates the nostrils.

To keep children safe from button battery injuries:

  • Use screws provided and tape to keep battery compartments sealed shut.
  • Keep loose batteries out of children’s reach. Never place batteries in cups or near pill bottles.
  • Check with your garbage company or local authorities to find out how to recycle batteries. Authorities advise placing tape on both sides of the dead battery and storing it in a zip bag out of children’s reach.