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By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
January 27, 2019
Category: Immunizations
Tags: immunizations   Vaccines   cdc  

CDC Launches New Video Series – “How Vaccines Work” 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases is excited to launch the first video of its newest, animated video series for parents, “How Vaccines Work.”

In these short videos, viewers follow baby Jack and his parents as they get answers to common vaccine-related questions and learn more about the importance of vaccinating on schedule. The first video describes how vaccines fight germs and provide long-lasting protection against 14 serious diseases. Watch “How Vaccines Work: How Do Germs Make Your Baby Sick? here.

CDC will be launching two additional videos in February and March covering topics including: “Vaccines and Your Baby’s Immune System” and “What to Expect When Your Child is Vaccinated.”

Learn more at: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/childhood-vaccines.

 

 
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 27, 2018
Category: Healthy Kids

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems

 

From the Academy of Pediatrics:

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS), also called e-cigarettes, personal vaporizers, vape pens, e-cigars, e-hookah, or vaping devices, are products that produce an aerosolized mixture containing flavored liquids and nicotine that is inhaled by the user. ENDS can resemble traditional tobacco products like cigarettes, cigars, pipes, or common gadgets like flashlights, flash drives, or pens.

These products have grown rapidly, particularly among youth and young adults. Youth use of ENDS products​​​ is a significant public health concern.

 

Quick Facts about ENDS

  • ENDS are the most commonly-used tobacco products among youth. In 2016, 11% of high schoolers and 4% of middle schoolers reported using e-cigarettes in the last 30 days.1
     
  • Youth who use ENDS products are more likely to use cigarettes or other tobacco products.​2,6
     
  • ENDS contain a liquid solution that is usually flavored. Flavors, which are appealing to children, can include fruit flavors, candy, coffee, piña colada, peppermint, bubble gum, or chocolate. You can read more about the ways the Tobacco Industry uses flavors to lure kids into using tobacco products in “The Flavor Trap​,” a report issued by AAP and four partner organizations.

  • ENDS solution has chemicals (ie, anti-freeze, diethylene glycol, and carcinogens like nitrosamines).3​​

  • ENDS devices mimic conventional cigarette use and help re-normalize smoking behaviors.

  • ENDS are not approved for smoking cessation, and the long-term health effects to users and bystanders are st​ill unknown. The chemical compounds in an ENDS device can vary between brands.3

  • E-liquid from ENDS devices and refill packs can contaminate skin, leading to nicotine poisoning. Symptoms of nicotine poisoning include vomiting, sweating, dizziness, increased heart rate, lethargy, seizures, and difficulty breathing.3

  • In 2014, poison centers in the US reported 3,783 exposures to e-cigarette devices and nicotine liquid, compared to only 1,543 exposures in 2013. In 2015, 3,073 exposures were reported.4

  • Some states have enacted legislation to require child-resistant packaging for ENDS devices and liquids, and a bill to do this at the national level was signed into law by President Obama in early 2016.

  • ENDS users should always keep e-cigarettes and liquid nicotine locked up and out of the reach of children and follow the specific disposal instructions on the label.5

  • In 2016, US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, MD MBA released a report, "E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General." The report concluded that youth should not use e-cigarettes due to the health effects on users and on others exposed to secondhand e-cigarette aerosol.6​

AAP Resources about ENDS

Sources

1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tobacco Use Among Middle and High School Students—United States, 2011–2016. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2017;66(23):597-603. Accessed July 28, 2017

2) Dutra LM, Glantz SA. Electronic cigarettes and conventional cigarette use among U.S. adolescents: a cross-sectional study. JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(7):610–617pmid:24604023​

3) American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Tobacco Control. Policy statement: Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems. Pediatrics. 2015; 136(5):1018—1026.

4) American Association of Poison Control Centers. January 31, 2016. Electronic Cigarettes and Liquid Nicotine Data. Accessed February 10, 2016.

5) American Association of Poison Control Centers. E-Cigarette Devices and Liquid Nicotine. Accessed October 16, 2015.

6) US Department of Health and Human Services (2016). E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 08, 2018
Tags: immunizations   Vaccines   newborns   travel   cdc   measles   MMR   Infants   Atlanta   Metro Atlanta  

 

Measles Cases Info from the CDC

From January 1 to April 21, 2018, 63 people from 16 states (Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas) were reported to have measles. No reports, yet, from Georgia.

In 2017, 118 people from 15 states and the District of Columbia were reported to have measles. In 2016, 86 people from 19 states were reported to have measles. In 2015, 188 people from 24 states and the District of Columbia were reported to have measles. In 2014, the United States experienced a record number of measles cases, with 667 cases from 27 states reported to CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD); this is the greatest number of cases since measles elimination was documented in the U.S. in 2000.

  • The majority of people who got measles were unvaccinated.
  • Measles is still common in many parts of the world including some countries in Europe, Asia, the Pacific, and Africa.
  • Travelers with measles continue to bring the disease into the U.S.
  • Measles can spread when it reaches a community in the U.S. where groups of people are unvaccinated.

It is never too late to get a Measles Vaccine if you are unimmunized. If you are planning a trip out of the USA you should definitely look into your Measles Immune status with your doctor or vaccine travel clinic at least a month before you travel. If you have family or friends who have impaired immunity, you should be considerate of them and also confirm that you have Measles immunity. Newborns and young infants can be vulnerable to Measles if it enters our city. There is a small but growing number of persons in Metro Atlanta who are choosing NOT to be immunized, making our area ripe for a Measles outbreak from imported Measles from abroad. We are an international city.

Visit http://www.immunize.org/vis/mmr.pdf to learn more about the Measles vaccine.

Number of measles cases by year since 2010

 

 

Measles cases per year
Year Cases
2010 63
2011 220
2012 55
2013 187
2014 667
2015 188
2016 86
2017 118
2018 63 in 4 months
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
February 28, 2018
Category: Technology
Tags: cdc   Free   App   Development   Milestones  

CDC app helps parents track developmental milestones

 

Tracking, supporting and celebrating children’s development from ages 2 months to 5 years just got a whole lo

t easier and more fun with an app from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The Milestone Tracker app helps parents learn about, support and track their child’s development, and then share their child’s progress during health maintenance visits. Parents who use the app will be more prepared to answer questions from their child’s health care professional and have more effective discussions about their child’s development.

The app is available on the App Store at http://apple.co/2BIJe0e and Google Play at http://bit.ly/2jMklZK.

Find more information about the app at www.cdc.gov/MilestoneTracker.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
October 07, 2017
Category: Immunizations

Correcting Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’S Vaccine ‘Facts’

 

September 22, 2017Original Article  By Paul A Offit

When people misrepresent facts on the record, journalists are in a tough spot — especially when that information can be harmful.

Which brings me to STAT’s recent interview with Robert F. Kennedy Jr., conducted by Helen Branswell. STAT wanted to interview Kennedy about his claim in January 2017 that Donald Trump would soon appoint him to head a commission on vaccine safety and scientific integrity. Seven months had passed since Kennedy had made the claim and no announcement had been made. STAT wanted to find out where things stood.

Branswell began her interview by asking Kennedy eight different times and in eight different ways where things stood on his commission. Each time, he failed to confirm or deny whether the White House was about to appoint him.

That clearly wasn’t what Kennedy wanted to talk about. Instead, he wanted to talk about his belief that mercury in vaccines is poisoning America’s children and that no one in the federal government seems to care. By insisting that the interview be conducted in the question-and-answer format, Kennedy effectively tied STAT’s hands, which had to print what he said without editorial comment or opposing views.

I feel compelled to oppose Kennedy’s claims.

During the interview, Kennedy said that some babies were being injected with 25 micrograms of ethylmercury, which is part of a preservative called thimerosol that is used in multi-dose vials of influenza vaccine. He claimed that amount to be “100 times” greater than the amount considered to be safe.

As an environmentalist, Kennedy should know that mercury is a natural part of the Earth’s crust. As a consequence, methylmercury (environmental mercury) is contained in water and anything made from water, like breast milk and infant formula. The human body eliminates ethylmercury from vaccines far more efficiently than it eliminates naturally occurring methylmercury.

Babies typically ingest about 360 micrograms of methylmercury during the first 6 months of life, well before they will ever receive their first dose of influenza vaccine. If the 25 micrograms of ethylmercury in vaccines is 100 times greater than what Kennedy claimed is safe, then simply by living on Earth, by 6 months of age babies will have ingested an amount of mercury that is 1,440 times greater than Kennedy’s safety limit.

According to Kennedy’s calculations, all of us are massively intoxicated with mercury. The only way to avoid this would be to move to another planet.

Kennedy also said that he wanted to ensure “that vaccines are subject to the same kind of safety scrutiny and safety testing that other drugs are subject to.” In fact, vaccines are subjected to greater scrutiny than drugs. Much greater. For example, the CDC spends tens of millions of dollars every year on the Vaccine Safety Datalink, a system of linked computerized medical records from several major health maintenance organizations that represents about 7 million Americans, 500,000 of whom are children. Nothing like this exists on the drug side. Frankly, if a Drug Safety Datalink existed, the problem with Vioxx as a cause of heart attacks might have been picked up much sooner.

Kennedy said, “We need to, prior to licensing vaccines, do gold standard safety testing, like every other drug approval requires. We need to do double-blind placebo testing.” Branswell knew that the FDA does require placebo-controlled trials before licensure. So she pushed back. “Sir, that’s done all the time,” she said. “That is done all the time.”

Branswell was right. Here’s an example of the kind of testing that vaccines are put through. One of the currently licensed vaccines against rotavirus was tested in a placebo-controlled, prospective, 11-country, four-year trial of more than 70,000 infants before being approved. That’s fairly typical of most pre-licensure trials. But STAT was stuck having to report Kennedy’s remarks as is, even though Branswell knew they were false. That was the deal. The interview had to be printed without contradiction.

Perhaps most outrageous was Kennedy’s claim that “the hepatitis B vaccines that are currently approved had fewer than five days of safety testing. That means that if the child has a seizure on the sixth day, it’s never seen. If the child dies, it’s never seen.” Safety monitoring for the hepatitis B vaccine, like all vaccines tested before being licensed, involved determining side effects in the vaccinated and unvaccinated group for weeks after each dose. Indeed, some subsets of vaccinated individuals have been monitored for 30 years after hepatitis B vaccination.

Throughout the interview, Kennedy never adequately addressed the new commission. Creating such a commission doesn’t make sense to me for two main reasons.

First, a vaccine safety commission already exists. It’s called the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Staffed by epidemiologists, microbiologists, virologists, statisticians, molecular biologists, and clinicians, the CDC supervises the Vaccine Safety Datalink, which I described earlier. Whenever a new vaccine is licensed, this system quickly determines who’s been vaccinated and who hasn’t and detects any side effects that might be occurring more frequently in the vaccinated group.

Second, a commission for scientific integrity also already exists. Independent of the CDC, it’s called the Office for Research Integrity, and is housed in the Department of Health and Human Services.

It’s unfortunate that our culture, and our media, sometimes give celebrities a chance to comment without opposition on subjects about which they are often misinformed. It’s invariably the listener or reader who suffers this advice. Maybe journalists could at the very least add a cigarette-style caution to interviews like the one that STAT did with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. Something like “CAUTION: Reading this article might be dangerous to your health.”

Paul A. Offit, M.D., is a professor of pediatrics and director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. His most recent book is “Pandora’s Lab: Seven Stories of Science Gone Wrong” (National Geographic Press, April 2017).