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Posts for tag: booster seats

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
September 19, 2019
Category: Safety
 
Graphic showing a baby in a rear facing car seat that reads

Child Passenger Safety Week starts today! Celebrate with us and help raise awareness about buckling children in age- and size- appropriate car seats, booster seats, or seat belts. This is a great week to learn how to:

  • buckle kids correctly,
  • identify and understand the car seat stages, and
  • avoid the common mistakes when using car seats, booster seats, and seat belts.

 

What you need to know:

  • Rear-facing car seat: Birth until age 2–4.
For the best possible protection, infants and toddlers should be properly buckled in a rear-facing car seat, in the back seat, until they reach the upper weight or height limits of their seat. Check the seat owner's manual and/or labels on the seat for weight and height limits.
  • Forward-facing car seat: After outgrowing rear-facing seat and until at least age 5.
When children outgrow their rear-facing seats, they should be properly buckled in a forward-facing car seat, in the back seat, until they reach the upper weight or height limit of their seat. Check the seat owner's manual and/or labels on the seat for weight and height limits. 
  • Booster seat: After outgrowing forward-facing seat and until seat belts fit properly.
Once children outgrow their forward-facing seat, they should be properly buckled in a belt positioning booster seat, in the back seat, until seat belts fit properly. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs (not the stomach) and the shoulder belt lays across the chest (not the neck). Proper seat belt fit usually occurs when children are about 4 feet 9 inches tall and aged 9–12. 
  • Seat Belt: Once seat belts fit properly without a booster seat.
Children no longer need to use a booster seat once seat belts fit properly. Seats belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs (not the stomach) and the shoulder belt lays across the chest (not the neck). Proper seat belt fit usually occurs when children are about 4 feet 9 inches tall and aged 9–12. 

Remember, always properly buckle children age 12 years and younger in the back seat!
 
To learn more about child passenger safety, please visit: www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/child_passenger_safety.
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
February 19, 2019
Category: Safety
Tags: teens   car seats   texting   distractions   booster seats  

Grand Rounds at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston Hospital was very interesting today. Dr. Mark Zonfrillo of Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Hasbro Children's Hospital spoke on Child and Adolescent Road Traffic Safety_a topic dear to the heart of most pediatrician and 21st Century parents and grandparents. 

He made some key points, among them were:

1] car restraint systems for children should be used all the time, even short neighborhood trips.

2] apparently fathers are less diligent than mother's in proper and regular use of children car restraint systems/car seats.

3] a car seat should be used until the child exceeds either the height OR weight standards of the individual car seat.

4] car seats that require a TETHER for proper use must use the tether for safety or the child may suffer avoidable injury or fatality otherwide.

5] booster seat use age range can go from 4 years through 10 years of age.

6] children are safest in the back seat of a vehicle and should not ride in the front passenger seat until 13 years of age.

7] car seats with five-point strap restraints are the safest restraint seat, especially facing the rear of the vehicle according to seat specifications.

8] Teen drivers' greatest driving risk is their LACK OF EXPERIENCE, which makes the first 6 months of their driving the period of greatest risk of fatality or injury.

9] the second greatest risk factor for teen drivers are other teen passengers in the vehicle. The risk and the number of crashes increase with increasing numbers of teen passengers in the vehicle with a teen driver. Apparently GA law allows no teen passengers in a vehicle with a teen driver in the first year of driving. In South Carolina, one teen passenger is allowed in the vehicle with a teen driver.

10] GA has a midnight teen curfew for teen drivers.

11] To correct inexperience, teen drivers need a minimum of 30 to 50 hours of SUPERVISED driving by an experienced adult driver.

12] Teens because of their inexperience driving are poor at hazard detection and anticipating or scanning for hazards when driving.

13] Teens have poor insight into the SIGNIFICANCE of their inexperience driving.

14] 16 years is the minimum age in GA for unsupervised teen driving.

15] It takes about 5 sec to do a cell phone text; at 55 MPH, in those 5 seconds, the vehicle will travel the length of a football field. There is increased risk of accident if one's eyes are off the road for greater than two seconds. https://www.itcanwait.com/

It was quite a presentation and very sobering. It reminds me when my daughters were teens, my wife and I had them take a performace driving course at the Atlanta Motor Speedway, https://atlantamotorsportspark.com/teen-driving/.  We do what we can! But I really like the idea of 30-50 hours of supervised teen driving by a parent or other experienced adult from the initial point of teen licensing.

Dr. T