My Blog

Posts for tag: Sunblock

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 14, 2019
Category: Prevention
Tags: safety   sunburn   Sunblock   sun   burn   suntan  

Encourage your teen to avoid solar radiation between 10 A.M. and 4 P.M

This is when the ultraviolet rays are the harshest. The safest measure—stay indoors or seek shade—isn’t always practical. Next best? Protect that skin by wearing the proper clothing and sunscreen.

Light-colored, tightly woven clothing

Light-colored, tightly woven clothing reflects sunlight rather than absorbs it. A hat with a brim at least three inches wide also affords protection.

Get your teen into the habit of applying sunscreen

And not just when she goes to the beach and not just on bright, sunny days. Even when clouds obscure the sun, 80 percent of its UV light reaches the earth. You can singe your skin during the winter, too, since snow reflects 80 percent of the sun’s rays.

Sunscreens used to be classified according to their sun protection strength, which was expressed as a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) ranging from 2 to 50. The higher the number, the longer the user can stay in the sun without burning. So let’s say that your youngster typically burns in about fifteen minutes. A sunblock with an SPF of 15 would afford him 225 minutes (just under four hours) of safe exposure. If he is dark-complexioned and generally doesn’t burn for, say, forty minutes, the same product would enable him to spend six hundred worry-free minutes outdoors.

Having said that, no one should bake in the sun for that long, regardless of how much sunscreen he slathers on his skin. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has since pared down the categories to just three strengths: minimum (which corresponds to 2 SPF to 12 SPF), moderate (12 SPF to 30 SPF) and high (30 SPF or greater). Moderate strength is the sensible choice for most people.

Memo to Mom and Dad: Before purchasing sunscreen, look for the words “broad-spectrum” on the label; this assures you that the product screens out both types of ultraviolet light: UVA and UVB. UVA radiation doesn’t burn skin as readily as UVB—and the jury is still out on whether or not it contributes to skin cancer—but we do know that UVA rays penetrate tissue more deeply and age the skin.

Buying sunscreen is the first step; using it correctly is the second

Studies show than most sun worshipers use only about one-fifth to one-half as much sunscreen as they should. To thoroughly cover the entire body—including the ears and hands, which most people neglect—the general rule of thumb is to apply about one ounce of water-resistant lotion or cream fifteen to thirty minutes before going outdoors. Then generously reapply every two hours and immediately after swimming or strenuous activities.

Protect the eyes too

According to the American Optometric Association, sunglasses should block out 99 to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB radiation and screen out 75 to 90 percent of visible light. Gray, green or brown lenses work best.

The American Academy of Dermatology recommends that teens periodically inspect their bodies for suspicious-looking moles

To do this, they’ll need a full-length mirror, a hand mirror, and a well-lit room.

  1. Standing in front of the full-length mirror, examine the front and back of the body. Then, with arms raised, do the same for the left side and the right side.
  2. Bend both elbows and carefully inspect the forearms, the back of the upper arms, and the palms of the hands.
  3. Next, look at the backs of the legs and the feet, the spaces between toes, and the soles of the feet.
  4. Hold up the hand mirror and examine the back of the neck and the scalp. Part hair to lift.
  5. Finally, check the back and the buttocks with the hand mirror.
  6. If you spot any unusual-looking moles, immediately make an appointment with your pediatrician. Skin cancers are eminently treatable when caught early.
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
April 28, 2018
Category: Safety
Tags: sunburn   Melanoma   Skin Cancer   Sunblock   Slip Slop Slap   SPF   Shade   Shirt   Sunglasses   Hat  

 

 

   "Slip, Slop, Slap" You can stop skin cancer & melanoma Today!

 

 

10 Myths about Sun Protection

There's no such thing as a "safe" base tan. A tan is the body's response to injury from UV rays, showing that damage has been done. Protect yourself and learn the truth about tanning: http://bit.ly/2GwLw4V

Indoor tanning is harmful and can lead to skin cancers like melanoma. It's particularly dangerous for minors and young adults. Get more facts about indoor tanning from CDC: http://bit.ly/2q0YqB2

What can you do to reduce your risk of skin cancer, including melanoma? Avoid indoor tanning, use sunscreen, and stay in the shade during midday hours: http://bit.ly/2GPxn6i

Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is commonly caused by UV exposure, but many people still don't use sunscreen regularly. Protect all the skin you're in with these tips from CDC: http://bit.ly/2pYC8Rm

Did you know you can protect your family and yourself from skin cancers like melanoma? Start with these tips from CDC to stay sun safe outdoors: http://bit.ly/2GuIcLp 

The weekend is a great time to get outdoors and enjoy time with your family and friends, but don't forget your sunscreen and hat! Find more tips on preventing skin cancers like melanoma here: http://bit.ly/2uHWX8a

Don't get burned by tanning myths like this one: "Indoor tanning is the safer way to tan." The truth is that indoor tanning exposes you to intense UV rays and increases your risk of melanoma. More info: http://bit.ly/2JhaBSX

Indoor tanning causes wrinkles and age spots, changes your skin's texture and can lead to skin cancers like melanoma. Every time you tan you increase your risk of getting skin cancer, including melanoma. More facts from CDC: http://bit.ly/2q0YqB2

Do you know the ABCDE's of melanoma? This handy guide from CDC reminds you to regularly check for changes in your skin and what to look for when you check: http://bit.ly/2GSmXTc

We usually think of sunburn as something that happens at the beach, but did you know more people get sunburned during day-to-day activities? Learn how you can prevent UV damage and cut your risk of skin cancer: http://bit.ly/2kNIAGq