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Posts for tag: Guide

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
July 31, 2018
Category: Books
Tags: parenting   behavior   Guide   ADD   ADHD  
Parental Involvement
Parents of children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder are constantly asking teachers what they can do to manage their child’s behavior at home and support their child’s success at school. The Parent’s Guide to Attention Deficit Disorder (390 pages, © 1995) provides logical and useful suggestions for those parents who have been searching for solutions to their child’s problems. Using the same format as the most successful intervention manuals Hawthorne has developed for educators, parents now have hundreds of suggestions available to them to help their child who has an Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. The guide is based on behaviors from the Home Versionof the Attention Deficit Disorder Evaluation Scale - Fourth Edition and is easily referenced by the categories of Inattentive and Hyperactive-Impulsive. The Parent’s Guide to Attention Deficit Disorder has been expanded to include 144 additional behaviors.

 

This Guide is available on Amazon.com.

2nd edition © 1995) provides logical and useful suggestions for those parents who have been searching for solutions to their child's problems. Using the same format as the most successful intervention manuals Hawthorne has developed for educators, parents now have hundreds of suggestions available to them to help their child who has an Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

 

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
July 31, 2018
Category: Books
Tags: parenting   behavior   Guide   Solutions   Home  

PARENT’S GUIDE
Solutions to Today’s Most Common Behavior Problems in the Home

 

by Stephen B. McCarney, Ed.D. &
Angela M. Bauer, M.Ed.

© 1990

 

This is one of the most valuable resources available for today’s parents.

Item #01300

The Parent’s Guide is a collection of specific strategies for the 102 most common behavior problems encountered in and around the home. This is one of the most comprehensive guides available for parents to improve parenting skills by providing positive interventions to remediate the behavior problems of children and youth. The Parent’s Guideis the perfect resource for parents of special needs children, foster parents, adoptive parents, or any parent/guardian who wishes to improve his or her skills in coping with the demands of raising children today. As parents and guardians use the Parent’s Guide, their skills will improve as they apply the specific intervention strategies to behavior problems encountered in the home environment. 
The user-friendly format of the Parent’s Guide (240 pages, © 1990) will prove much more useful and convenient than other resources on the subject because the guide was developed to respond to the need to know what to do - NOW. The Parent’s Guide reduces the need for costly and time-consuming training programs by placing an authoritative resource in the hands and homes of parents where it is most needed.

 

Characteristics of The Parent’s Guide 

The Parent’s Guide 

  • contains strategies for dealing with the 102 most common behavior problems around the home,
     
  • has a comprehensive listing of strategies that allows parents/guardians to select the specific strategies which are most likely to be successful, 
     
  • is individualized, and
     
  • is used by parents or guardians in the home environment.

 

01300
Parent's Guide
$25.00

 

Also available on Amazon.com.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
July 31, 2018
Category: Books
Tags: Guide   ADD   ADHD   LD   Survival  
Survival Guide for College Students With ADHD or LD, Second Edition by [Nadeau, Kathleen G.]
 

Author

 
 

This useful guide for high school or college students diagnosed with attention deficit disorder or learning disabilities will provide the information they need to survive and thrive in the college setting. The Survival Guide is filled with practical suggestions and tips from an experienced specialist in the field and from college students who also suffer from these difficulties.

This book will help ADD and LD students to:

  • choose the right college
  • assess the services a college offers
  • arrange for extended-time exams
  • schedule classes advantageously
  • select an appropriate major
  • work with a career counselor
  • initiate and maintain helpful relationships with professors

Many valuable suggestions on how students can help themselves are also included in the Survival Guide. These include ways to study, how to manage time, overcoming procrastination, organizing oneself, resisting temptation, minimizing distractions, reducing frustrations, building a support network, learning self-advocacy, scheduling extracurricular activities, and choosing part-time employment.

 
 
 
 
 

 

Survival  Guide for College Students With ADHD or LD, Second Edition Kindle Edition

by Kathleen G. Nadeau  (Author)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 10, 2018
Category: Behavior
Tags: Time Out   Guide   Bad Behavior  

 

A Parent's Guide to Using Time-Out

Am Fam Physician. 2018 May 15;97(10):online.

Time-out is an effective way for parents to stop bad behaviors in their child. For time-out to work, you must do it the same way every time. Also, make sure to reward good behavior often when the child is not in time-out. For example, give a pat on the shoulder or a hug, give your child praise, or start a sticker chart.

Preparing for the Use of Time-Out

  • Put a timer where the child can see it. Although a smartphone timer is fine, an inexpensive, portable kitchen timer also works well.

  • Pick a good spot for time-out. During time-out, the child should not be able to hear the radio or other music, hear or see the television, or be able to look out a window. The time-out spot shouldn't be the child's bedroom or someplace a lot of people will be walking through. It shouldn't be uncomfortable or confining (like a closet). There should be nothing dangerous or poisonous nearby.

  • Only use time-out for the most problematic behaviors, like hitting a brother or sister or not following important directions.

  • You should be very clear with your child about which behaviors will result in time-out and how time-out works. It may help to walk your child through the process of time-out and let your child know what happens if he or she does not stay in time-out. Only use time-out for the behaviors you have decided on ahead of time and have talked about with your child.

Using Time-Out

  • Once a behavior that you've decided will result in time-out occurs, quickly explain in a matter-of-fact way that the child must go to time-out and why. Stay calm and walk or carry the child to time-out. Don't speak to the child or make eye contact.

  • Set the timer for one minute for each year of the child's age up to five minutes.

  • If the child screams or gets up before the time is up, place the child back in time-out without talking to or looking at the child, and reset the time. The child must be quiet for the entire time before leaving time-out. Make sure to stay busy and out of view of your child during time-out. Remind brothers and sisters and others that they should not interact with the child who is in time-out.

  • Once the time-out is over, the child should have a clean slate. Don't dwell on the problem behavior or let it influence how you treat the child after the time-out. If necessary, ask the child to apologize (for example, to the person he or she hit) or to clean up a mess caused by the problem behavior.

  • Make sure that time-in is pleasant. Look often for chances to praise or reward your child for good behavior.

Tips if Time-Out Isn't Working

  • Make sure you are using time-out the same way every time

  • Make sure the child isn't being warned multiple times before time-out is started

  • When a child is in time-out:

    - Don't look at the child

    - Don't talk to the child

    - Don't talk about the child

    - Remain calm and do not show anger

    - Monitor from close by, but not in the same room

    - Be consistent and don't give up

This handout is provided to you by your family doctor and the American Academy of Family Physicians. 

This information provides a general overview and may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor or pediatrician to find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on this subject.