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Posts for: October, 2018

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
October 30, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged
 
 

Half of parents surveyed say flu shot causes the flu

 

by  | TuesdayOct. 30, 2018, 1:33 a.m. of TribLive

 

A new survey on parents’ attitudes toward the flu vaccine may shed light on why some continue to resist it even though not getting vaccinated could put their children in danger.

A national survey of 700 parents by Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital showed more than half the respondents said the flu shot can cause flu. One-third said the flu shot didn’t work.

“With any medication or vaccine, people are going to have concerns,” Dr. Jean Moorjani, a board-certified pediatrician at Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children, said in a news release. “Because information can come from so many places, from friends and family to the internet, it’s important to talk to a doctor you trust to get credible information that is based in science and facts.”

The survey also found:

• 30 percent of the respondents thought flu shot is a conspiracy.

• 28 percent said flu caused autism.

“After extensive studies, we know that the flu vaccine is safe,” Moorjani said. “You cannot get autism from the flu vaccine. It is not a conspiracy for doctors to recommend the flu vaccine. Doctors recommend it because we know — based on science, research and facts — that it is the best way to protect yourself and your family against the flu.”

Here’s a bit of good news from the survey: about 70 percent of the parents said that the flu vaccine is the best way to protect their children from flu.

“It takes time for your body to get strong and ready for flu season, which is why we recommend everybody get the shot as soon as they can. If you are infected with the flu shortly after getting your flu shot, your body may not be able to fight it off,” Moorjani said.

Naseem S. Miller is a writer for the Orlando Sentinel.

 

My take on this is simply three points:

   *********

1] A non-viable vaccine made from components of a live organism can not grow and reproduce even in this age of Zombie SciFi as in "The Walking Dead." A killed vaccine can not grow and cause the disease called by the living organism. Period!

2] Any vaccine can cause side-effects, but these side-effects are nominal compared to the illness caused by the live germ.

3] Most vaccines take at least two weeks after administration to produce enough protective antibodies to prevent the illness for which it is given. In other words, a person can develop the illness, e.g. influenza, from exposure to others who are ill before antibodies are sufficient to protect the immunized person. That's why it is wise to get a flu shot in early Autumn before exposure to flu is more likely as we move into the winter season.

 

Dr. T

 

 

tt


By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
October 21, 2018
Tags: immunizations   Vaccines   measles   MMR   Atlanta   epidemic   Europe   ATL  

We should all be worried about a Measles outbreak in Metro ATL. We are, afterall, an international city.

All adults born after 1978 should have had two Measles vaccines (MMR). Children should have had their first MMR between age 12 & 15 months. I prefer age 12 month at the one year checkup.

The 2nd MMR is due between 4 and 6 years old. I prefer the four year checkup. In any case, children older than age 6 years, should have had two MMR vacines to be considered adequately immunized. If we have an outbreak in Metro and suburban Atlanta, a 3rd MMR may be recommended in selected geographic areas and among selected persons. 

Atlanta is prime for an outbreak with an increasing number of under-immunized children. 

Stay tuned to our local media!

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/kids-health/measles-outbreak-raging-europe-could-be-brought-u-s-doctors-n922146?cid=eml_nbn_20181021

www.cdc/vaccines

www.immunize.org

Dr. T

 


By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
October 16, 2018
Category: Immunizations

Misinformation About the HPV Vaccine Keeps Vaccination Rates Low

The Overwhelming Safety of the HPV Vaccine

Paul A. Offit, MD

September 07, 2018

No vaccine has suffered more from misinformation and ill-founded concerns than the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Antivaccine activists have claimed that HPV vaccine causes chronic pain syndromes, chronic fatigue, sudden death, and a variety of autoimmune disorders. In addition, activists have gone so far as to claim that the HPV vaccine increases risky sexual behavior. These claims are often supported by the media as well as by substandard studies published in predatory journals. Indeed, on December 4, 2013, Katie Couric, in a segment titled "HPV Vaccine Controversy," interviewed two mothers: One claimed that the vaccine had caused her daughter to suffer chronic fatigue, the other that the vaccine had caused an otherwise unexplained death.

As a consequence of such fears, immunization rates for the HPV vaccine remain low. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only 53% of girls and 44% of boys have received the recommended doses.[1] As currently constructed, the HPV vaccine—which contains the L1 surface protein from nine different strains—will prevent about 29,000 cases of HPV-associated cancers and 5000 deaths a year.[2] Unfortunately, because only about half of US adolescents have received this vaccine, every year about 15,000 people are destined to suffer and 2000 to die from a preventable cancer.

To the credit of the scientific and medical communities, millions of dollars have been spent on studies examining the safety of the HPV vaccine. Pre-licensure, about 30,000 people were studied for 7 years.[2] Post-licensure, more than 1 million people have been formally studied, examining all manner of chronic pain and fatigue syndromes as well as more than a dozen different rheumatologic diseases.[3,4,5,6] Not surprisingly, the HPV vaccine has not been found to cause any chronic or debilitating condition. Indeed, the HPV vaccine is probably the world's best-studied, modern-day vaccine.

Another Unwarranted Concern Debunked: Primary Ovarian Insufficiency

One concern recently raised by antivaccine activists is that the HPV vaccine causes primary ovarian insufficiency. How this concern was born remains a mystery. HPV doesn't infect the ovaries. And the HPV L1 surface protein doesn't mimic proteins on ovarian cells, which would at least make an autoimmune disease biologically plausible. Nonetheless, the fear persists. To address this concern, researchers at Kaiser Permanente Northwest examined a cohort of 199,078 female patients, finding 120 with a diagnosis of primary ovarian insufficiency.[7] The researchers found no statistically significant elevation of risk for ovarian failure following receipt of the HPV vaccine. They also didn't find an increased risk following receipt of the Tdap, MenACWY, or inactivated influenza vaccines.

The Kaiser Permanente study can now be added to the mountain of evidence that should reassure clinicians and parents that the HPV vaccine is safe. HPV, on the other hand, isn't safe. And until we dramatically increase immunization rates against this common, devastating infection, children will continue to suffer our ignorance.

·References

Medscape Infectious Diseases © 2018 WebMD, LLC


By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
October 15, 2018
Category: Safety
Tags: safety   Fire   Bedroom   Door  

Why You Should Always Close The Door Before You Go To Bed; It could save your life.

From Women's Health by 

Your nightly routine can (and should) include brushing your teeth, washing your face, and getting into comfy PJs, but new information shows that most Americans skip a very important step before climbing into bed.

Nearly 60% of people sleep with their bedroom door open, according to a recent survey conducted by the safety science organization UL. That simple choice could mean life or death in the event of a house fire, as a closed door can slow the spread of flames, reduce toxic smoke, improve oxygen levels, and decrease temperatures.

With the increased use of synthetics in furniture and home construction, closing the door could make all the difference when it comes to getting out safely. The average time to escape a home fire has gone from 17 minutes to just three minutes or less in the past few decades due to flammable materials and contemporary open floor plans.

It's not only about a lack of awareness. Most people who sleep with the door open do so because they mistakenly believe it's safer — but it's the exact opposite of what firefighters recommend. That's why the UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute (FSRI) has launched a new public safety effort to coincide with National Fire Prevention Week, going on right now.

The "Close Before You Doze" campaign aims to share how closed doors can help save people's lives. In one eye-opening demonstration, the group showed how a fire burns in a closed room versus an open one. The side-by-side video footage reveals what an impact a door can make.

Start making it a habit to close not only your own bedroom door at night, but your kids' rooms as well. It's also a good time to test smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, check your home for potential fire hazards, and review your family's escape plan, or create one if you haven't already. Those small precautions could make all the difference.