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Posts for category: Infectious Diseases

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 18, 2019
Tags: travel   vacation   measles   Traveling  

Measles Cases and Outbreaks

 

Measles outbreaks in the United States are ongoing. For data as of June 13,

visit Measles Cases and Outbreaks.

Most measles cases in the U.S. are related to international travel. Make

sure you and your loved ones are protected before you travel internationally.

Visit Measles: For Travelers.

 

After international travel: Watch for measles

Measles is highly contagious and can spread to others through

coughing and sneezing. Measles is so contagious that if one person has it,

90% of the people close to that person who are not immune will also

become infected. An infected person can spread measles to others 4 days

before the rash even develops.

Watch your health for 3 weeks after you return. Measles symptoms typically

include:

  • high fever (may spike to more than 104° F)
  • cough
  • runny nose (coryza)
  • red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis)
  • rash (3-5 days after symptoms begin)

If you or your child gets sick with a rash and fever, call your doctor. Be sure

to tell your doctor that you traveled abroad, and whether you have received

MMR vaccine.

Backyard Poultry – Salmonella Infections

Updated 5/24/2019

Officials are currently investigating multistate outbreaks of Salmonella infections linked to contact with backyard poultry.

Situation

  • Location: U.S. Multistate (case count map)
  • Description: Salmonella infections, linked to contact with backyard poultry (such as chicks and ducklings) from multiple hatcheries
  • Number of infections: 52 (as of 5/10/19)
  • Pediatric population affected: All pediatric populations at risk, especially children who live in homes with backyard poultry.

Background

  • Fifty-two people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella have been reported from 21 states. Cases began on dates from January 12, 2019 to April 29, 2019.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicate that contact with backyard poultry (such as chicks and ducklings) from multiple hatcheries is the likely source of these outbreaks.
  • People reported obtaining chicks and ducklings from several sources, including agricultural stores, websites, and hatcheries.
  • Nineteen percent of ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.
  • Twenty-eight percent of ill people were children younger than 5 years.
  • Children younger than 5 years, immunocompromised individuals and people with hemaglobinopathies, pregnant women, the elderly, and those with chronic gastrointestinal tract disease are more likely to have a severe Salmonella illness.

Action (also applicable when visiting Petting Zoos or having residential backyard farm animal/reptile parties)

  • Prevention
    • People should always wash their hands with soap and water right after touching backyard poultry or anything in the area where they live and roam.
    • Adults should supervise handwashing by young children.
    • Use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not readily available.

Resources

  • What you should know:
    • People can get sick with Salmonella from touching backyard poultry & residential party farm animals/reptiles, and visiting petting zoos or their environment. These birds, animals & reptiles can be carrying Salmonella bacteria but appear healthy and clean and show no signs of illness.
    • If you have backyard poultry or attend backyard parties with farm animals and/or reptiles or visit petting zoos, follow these tips to stay healthy:
      • Always wash your hands with soap and water right after touching these backyard animals, petting zoos or anything in the area where they live and roam.
        • Adults should supervise handwashing by young children.
        • Use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not readily available.
      • Don’t let backyard poultry or party animals inside the house, especially in areas where food or drink are prepared, served, or stored.
      • Set aside a pair of shoes to wear while taking care of poultry, backyard animals or visiting petting zoos and keep those shoes outside of the house.
      • Children younger than 5, adults over 65, and people with weakened immune systems should not handle or touch chicks, ducklings, or other poultry or the visiting animals at residential parties or those at petting zoos.
      • Don’t eat or drink where poultry, farm animals or petting zoo animals live or roam.
      • Don’t kiss backyard poultry or snuggle with them and then do not touch your face or mouth. Also true for petting zoos and residential farm animal/reptile paties.
      • Stay outdoors when cleaning any equipment or materials used to raise or care for poultry, such as cages, or feed or water containers.
    • Contact your health care professional if you think you may have become ill from contacting backyard poultry. Most people infected with Salmonella develop the following signs and symptoms 12 to 72 hours after eating a contaminated product:
      • Diarrhea
      • Fever
      • Abdominal cramps
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
November 06, 2018
Tags: Influenza   Flu   immunizations   Vaccines   death   Myths  

 

A child in Florida has become the first person to die of the flu this season, according to state health officials. State epidemiologists say the child had not been vaccinated and was otherwise healthy before getting sick with the flu.

The child, who tested positive for influenza B, died sometime during the week of Sept. 30, although privacy concerns prevent officials from saying exactly where, CBS affiliate WTSP reports.

Last flu season, 183 children in the U.S. died from flu or flu-related causes. That's the most since the CDC began keeping these records in 2004. Overall, an estimated 80,000 Americans died from flu last season.

CBS News medical contributor Dr. Tara Narula says this latest news should be a wake-up call to parents to get their children vaccinated. 

"What this is a strong clear message to parents about the importance of vaccination," she told "CBS This Morning." "This vaccine is safe. It is the most effective tool we have. And we know of the pediatric deaths last year, 80 percent were in kids who were unvaccinated."

8 common myths about cold and flu debunked

A new survey suggests that many children may not be getting the potentially life-saving flu shot because of their parents' misconceptions about the safety and importance of vaccines.

The survey by Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital found:

More than half of parents think that their child can get the flu from the flu shot.30 percentof parents feel flu vaccines are a conspiracy.28 percentof parents believe flu vaccines can cause autism.

"None of these things are true. It's important that we deal with the science and the facts," Narula said.

The CDC recommends everyone age 6 months and older get vaccinated against the fluevery year.

"Officials have said it's like wearing a seat belt," Narula said. "This is really a no-brainer for parents."

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
October 21, 2018
Tags: immunizations   Vaccines   measles   MMR   Atlanta   epidemic   Europe   ATL  

We should all be worried about a Measles outbreak in Metro ATL. We are, afterall, an international city.

All adults born after 1978 should have had two Measles vaccines (MMR). Children should have had their first MMR between age 12 & 15 months. I prefer age 12 month at the one year checkup.

The 2nd MMR is due between 4 and 6 years old. I prefer the four year checkup. In any case, children older than age 6 years, should have had two MMR vacines to be considered adequately immunized. If we have an outbreak in Metro and suburban Atlanta, a 3rd MMR may be recommended in selected geographic areas and among selected persons. 

Atlanta is prime for an outbreak with an increasing number of under-immunized children. 

Stay tuned to our local media!

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/kids-health/measles-outbreak-raging-europe-could-be-brought-u-s-doctors-n922146?cid=eml_nbn_20181021

www.cdc/vaccines

www.immunize.org

Dr. T

 

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
August 23, 2018
Tags: Cough   Influenza   immunizations   Vaccines   DTaP   Tdap   Pertussis   Whooping Cough   DTP  

Whooping Cough, Claimed the Life of a San Bernardino County Infant

 

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced [Tue 17 Jul 2018] pertussis, better known as whooping cough, claimed the life of a San Bernardino county infant. This is the 1st confirmed infant death from the disease since 2016, when 2 deaths occurred.

 

"This baby's death is a tragedy for the family and for California as a community, as this is a preventable disease," said Dr Karen Smith, CDPH director and state public health officer. "This serves as a grim reminder that whooping cough is always present in our communities, and immunizations are the 1st line of defense."


What whooping Cough looks and sounds like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIV460AQUWk

 

Akron's Children's Hospital Video about Pertussis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QWdEwjBEBw

 

Each year, 50-200 California infants are hospitalized with pertussis. CDPH and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that expectant mothers receive the whooping cough booster shot (also called Tdap, or tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis vaccine) at the earliest opportunity between 27 and 36 weeks of every pregnancy, even if previously immunized. Getting immunized during pregnancy boosts a mother's immunity and passes on protective antibodies directly to their babies before birth. This helps protect newborns until they are old enough to begin receiving their own whooping cough immunizations at 6 to 8 weeks of age.

 

"No baby should have to be hospitalized due to a vaccine-preventable disease, and certainly no baby should die," said Dr Smith. "To give babies the best protection, I urge all pregnant women to get vaccinated against whooping cough as early as possible during the 3rd trimester of every pregnancy."

 

To avoid the spread of whooping cough, CDPH also recommends that:

- parents immunize their babies against whooping cough as soon as possible. The 1st dose is recommended at 2 months of age, but can be given as early as 6 weeks of age;

- California 7th grade students [should] receive the whooping cough booster, Tdap;

- adults should receive a whooping cough booster once in their lives.

 

 

Dominican Republic

Source: Hoy Digital [in Spanish, machine trans, edited

Two children under 2 [years of age] died in the last week at the Robert Reid Cabral Children's Hospital because of whooping cough, a contagious and vaccine-preventable disease. The dead are a girl aged 15 months from the community of Cambita, San Cristóbal and another one of 3 months, who lived in La Romana.

 

Also, another 28 children have been admitted with this disease, which calls the attention of the pediatricians of the hospital, since the vaccine that immunizes is included in the Expanded Program of Immunizations (PAI).

 

The official website of the Ministry of Health, in the epidemiology component, defines pertussis as an endemic respiratory disease that commonly affects children under the age of 5, with infants under 6 months of age at the highest risk of complications, but also it can affect teenagers and adults. The use of the vaccination scheme with DPT [diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus] or pentavalent [diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, and _Haemophilus influenzae_ type b (Hib)] is the main prevention measure, while pertussis outbreaks tend to occur every 3 to 4 years, according to official information.

 

So far this year [2018], 29 probable cases of whooping cough have been reported, 7 in the last 4 epidemiological weeks. As many as 9 out of 10 cases correspond to children under 1 year of age. Santo Domingo Norte and Santiago are the demarcations that register the highest number of cases.

 

Faced with this situation, the Ministry of Health instructed the provincial directorates and corresponding health areas to ensure adequate research and response to preventable diseases.

 

 

Dr. T comments:

For every case of reported Whooping Cough, 100 cases go unreported and unrecognized. Teens and adults are usually not as sick as children under age one year, but they are highly contagious. Whooping Cough is called the 100 day cough. Sometimes the cough is so bad, that one can break a rib or two. Women who are pregnant are antibody factories. That is why pregnant women are encouraged to have the Tdap vaccine shot every pregnancy in their last trimester even if they have had it before. The antibodies against Pertussis that they produce because of the Tdap vaccine passes through the placenta to their babies offering them some protection until their babies are old enough to receive immunizations to stimulate their own immune systems to produce their own protective antibodies. 

 

The same reasoning applies to pregnant women getting the influenza shot in their last trimester as well. Babies can not get a flu shot until they are six months old. So in addition to the gift of life, mothers who get the flu shot (in season) and a Tdap also give the gifts of antibody protection to their newborn infants. Not a bad way to start a healthy life!

 

The Wrong way to Cover Your Mouth when coughing!

 

If a person has had the disease, Whooping Cough, this disease does not convey life-long immunity as many other illnesses do. Appropriate immunizations against Whooping Cough also do not convey life-long immunity to the disease. All teens and adults should have at least one Tdap vaccine. Right now there is no recommendation for adults to have Tdap booster, however we know that Whooping Cough antibody protection from a Tdap only lasts 3-5 years. Even though we depend on a mother's Tdap antibodies passing through the placenta to protect her baby, even though it is not Public health Policy, it still seems wise to me that all adults who are going to be around a newborn in the baby's first year of life should have a current Tdap "booster" if it has been more than 3 or 4 years since the adult's last Tdap. Perhaps National Policy will eventually change to this recommendation. Don't know! But I do know that Pertussis antibodies from a Tdap only last 3-5 years and then are gone.

 

All forms of Whooping Cough immunizations are effective and safe and can be given with any other vaccine that is needed, e.g. influenza vaccine, etc. As a community we depend on each other for many things. This includes protection from serious disease. We expect restaurant employees to wash hands before they leave the restroom. We expect each other to not drink and drive, to not text and drive, to cover our face appropriately when we cough. Similarly, we should expect each other to get safe and effective immunizations to protect each other, our children and our families from preventable contafious disease. 

 

Ask your doctors about your current immunizations status and that of your children. If you've not had a Tdap, get one. If you've not had a flu shot, plan to get one. The flu shot is now so purified, that even people with egg allergy can get one. September and October are perfect months for a flu shot. The flu shot is preferred this year, 2018, over the nasal spray influenza vaccine.