My Blog
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 26, 2019
Category: Infectious Disease
Tags: immunizations   travel   cdc   measles   Travelers  

Most measles cases in the U.S. result from international travel. Make sure you and your loved ones are protected against measles before international travel.

https://www.cdc.gov/measles/plan-for-travel.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fmeasles%2Ftravelers.html

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 26, 2019
Category: Safety
Tags: Guns   death   Storage   2nd Amendment   Second Amendment   unlocked   Asking   firearms  
June 21 is "Asking Saves Kids Day"

On June 21st pediatricians were promoting a national campaign from the American Academy of Pediatrics and Brady United entitled Asking Saves Kids. It's never too late to ask this question even after June 21.
This annual campaign encourages caregivers/parents to ask about the presence of unlocked firearms in the homes their children visit on the first day of summer.  On ASK day June 21st, all physicians and medical staff were encouraged to ask families about safe firearm storage in their homes.  ASK Day is important because 1/3 of all American homes with children have a gun in them, and roughly 40% of gun owning households store their guns unlocked. The CDC estimates nearly 2 million children live in a home with loaded, unlocked guns. As a result, every 30 minutes a child or teen dies or is injured by a gun. In the state of Georgia from 2010-2017, 452 children died from firearm injuries.
This should not be the cost of our 2nd Amendment privileges. 

Please ASK one question that can change your child’s life when your child plays in your home or over at someone's residence:  
Is there an unlocked gun where my child plays?
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 18, 2019
Tags: travel   vacation   measles   Traveling  

Measles Cases and Outbreaks

 

Measles outbreaks in the United States are ongoing. For data as of June 13,

visit Measles Cases and Outbreaks.

Most measles cases in the U.S. are related to international travel. Make

sure you and your loved ones are protected before you travel internationally.

Visit Measles: For Travelers.

 

After international travel: Watch for measles

Measles is highly contagious and can spread to others through

coughing and sneezing. Measles is so contagious that if one person has it,

90% of the people close to that person who are not immune will also

become infected. An infected person can spread measles to others 4 days

before the rash even develops.

Watch your health for 3 weeks after you return. Measles symptoms typically

include:

  • high fever (may spike to more than 104° F)
  • cough
  • runny nose (coryza)
  • red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis)
  • rash (3-5 days after symptoms begin)

If you or your child gets sick with a rash and fever, call your doctor. Be sure

to tell your doctor that you traveled abroad, and whether you have received

MMR vaccine.

By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
June 06, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Today I listened to a one hour Georgia Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics about imminent guidelines for proof of receipt of immunization against Meningococcal Meningitis vaccine at age 16 hears on entry to the 11th grade in high school. Parents should expect to hear or have heard about this updated requirement. The school system has about 14 months to effect procedure to make this a reality by August of 2020.  

At the end of the medical presentation, Jamie Shanbaum, shared her personal story of Meningococcal illness when she was 20 years old in college in Texas. All parents should hear her experience in her own words. I hope to attach an MP3 file of her talk in the near future. Meanwhile her is her story on her web page, http://www.thejamiegroup.org/

The Meningococcal ACWY vaccine is offered at age 11 years and needs a booster at age 16 for protection against this rapidly invasive bacteria with serious debilitating or fatal consequences from illness that can occur in highschool and college. 

CDC Vaccine Information Sheets:

http://immunize.org/vis/meningococcal_acwy.pdf

http://immunize.org/vis/meningococcal_b.pdf

            
 
By contactus@priority-pediatrics.com
May 31, 2019
Category: Immunizations
Tags: immunizations   Vaccines   Facts   History   Timeline  

Here's a look at information and statistics concerning vaccines in the United States.

Facts:

There are 14 different vaccines that are recommended for childrenbetween birth and age six, including those for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, influenza, measles, mumps and rubella.

For more than 100 years, there has been public discord regarding vaccines based on issues like individual rights, religious freedoms, distrust of government and the effects that vaccines may have on the health of children.

Exemptions to vaccines fall into three general categories: medical, religious and philosophical.


Median immunization coverage for state-required vaccines was approximately 94.3% for children entering kindergarten during the 2017-2018 school year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

As of May 2019, 47 states and the District of Columbia allow religious exemptions from vaccines, and 16 states allow philosophical (non-spiritual) exemptions.

Timeline:

1855 - Massachusetts mandates that school children are to be vaccinated (only the smallpox vaccine is available at the time).

February 20, 1905 - In Jacobson v. Massachusetts, the US Supreme Court upholds the State's right to compel immunizing against smallpox.

November 13, 1922 - The US Supreme Court denies any constitutional violation in Zucht v. King in which Rosalyn Zucht believes that requiring vaccines violates her right to liberty without due process. The High Court opines that city ordinances that require vaccinations for children to attend school are a "discretion required for the protection of the public health."

1952 -Dr. Jonas Salk and his team develop a vaccine for polio. A nationwide trial leads to the vaccine being declared in 1955 to be safe and effective.

1963 - The first measles vaccine is released.

1983 - schedule for active immunizations is recommended by the CDC.

March 19, 1992 - Rolling Stone publishes an article by Tom Curtis, "The Origin of AIDS," which presents a theory that ties HIV/AIDS to polio vaccines. Curtis writes that in the late 1950s, during a vaccination campaign in Africa, at least 325,000 people were immunized with a contaminated polio vaccine. The article alleges that the vaccine may have been contaminated with a monkey virus and is the cause of the human immunodeficiency virus, later known as HIV/AIDS.

August 10, 1993 - Congress passes the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act which creates the Vaccines for Children Program, providing qualified children free vaccines.

December 9, 1993 - Rolling Stone publishes an update to the Curtis article, clarifying that his theory was not fact, and Rolling Stone did not mean to suggest there was any scientific proof to support it, and the magazine regrets any damage caused by the article.

1998 - British researcher Andrew Wakefield and 12 other authors publish a paper stating they had evidence that linked the vaccination for Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) to autism. They claim they discovered the measles virus in the digestive systems of autistic children who were given the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. The publication leads to a widespread increase in the number of parents choosing not to vaccinate their children for fear of its link to autism.

2000 - The CDC declares the United States has achieved measles elimination, defined as "the absence of continuous disease transmission for 12 months or more in a specific geographic area."

2004 - Co-authors of the Wakefield study begin removing their names from the article when they discover Wakefield had been paid by lawyers representing parents who planned to sue vaccine manufacturers.

May 14, 2004 - The Institute of Medicine releases a report "rejecting a causal relationship between the MMR vaccine and autism."

February 2010 - The Lancet, the British medical journal that published Wakefield's study, officially retracts the article. Britain also revokes Wakefield's medical license.

2011 - Investigative reporter Brian Deer writes a series of articles in the BMJ exposing Wakefield's fraud. The articles state that he used distorted data and falsified medical histories of children that may have led to an unfounded relationship between vaccines and the development of autism.

2011 - The US Public Health Service finds that 63% of parents who refuse and delay vaccines do so for fear their children could have serious side effects.

2014 - The CDC reports the highest number of cases at 667 since declaring measles eliminated in 2000.

June 17, 2014 - After analyzing 10 studies, all of which looked at whether there was a link between vaccines and autism and involved a total of over one million children, the University of Sydney publishes a report saying there is no correlation between vaccinations and the development of autism.

December 2014 - A measles outbreak occurs at Disneyland in California.

2015 - In the wake of the theme park outbreak, 189 cases of measles are reported in 24 states and Washington, DC.

February 2015 - Advocacy group Autism Speaks releases a statement, "Over the last two decades, extensive research has asked whether there is any link between childhood vaccinations and autism. The results of this research are clear: Vaccines do not cause autism. We urge that all children be fully vaccinated."

May 28, 2015 - Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin signs a bill removing the philosophical exemption from the state's vaccination law. Parents may still request exemptions for medical or religious reasons. The law goes into effect on July 1, 2016.

June 30, 2015 - California Gov. Jerry Brown signs legislation closing the "vaccine exemption loophole," by eliminating any personal or religious exemptions for immunizing children who attend school. The law takes effect on July 1, 2016.

January 10, 2017 - Notable vaccine skeptic Robert F. Kennedy Jr. meets with President-elect Donald Trump. Afterwards, Kennedy tells reporters he agreed to chair a commission on "vaccination safety and scientific integrity." A Trump spokeswoman later says that no decision has been made about setting up a commission on autism.

August 23, 2018 -A study published in the American Journal of Public Health finds that Twitter accounts run by automated bots and Russian trolls masqueraded as legitimate users engaging in online vaccine debates. The bots and trolls posted a variety of anti-, pro- and neutral tweets and directly confronted vaccine skeptics, which "legitimize" the vaccine debate, according to the researchers.

October 11, 2018 - Two reports published by the CDC find that vaccine exemption rates and the percentage of unvaccinated children are on the rise.

2019 - As of May 24, the CDC has reported 940 individual cases of measles confirmed in 26 states.

January 2019 - The World Health Organization names vaccine hesitancy as one of 10 threats to global health in 2019.

March 26, 2019 - Rockland County, New York announces the "extremely unusual" step of banning unvaccinated individuals under age 18 from public places. One week later, a judge puts a hold on that and prohibits the county from enforcing the ban.

May 10, 2019 - Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signs legislation removing the philosophical exemption for the MMR vaccine from the state's school immunization requirements.

May 24, 2019 - Maine Gov. Janet Mills signs a bill into law removing all non-medical exemptions to vaccinations. The law will take effect in September 2021, and schoolchildren who claim a non-medical exemption prior to the law taking effect will be allowed to attend school if their parent or guardian provides a written statement from a healthcare professional indicating they've been informed of the risks of refusing immunization.





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